Havasupai students who sued for better education reach settlement with federal government

A federal judge approved a settlement between the federal Bureau of Indian Education and a group of Havasupai students who sued for better schooling, marking the first concrete result in a long-running case that could improve education for thousands of Native American students with disabilities. 



a sign on the side of a building: In 2017, Havasupai students and families sued the BIE for “longstanding educational deprivations.” A judge ruled in an ongoing case that the BIE violated its responsibility to provide students with disabilities education through services like individualized special education plans.


© Alden Woods/The Republic
In 2017, Havasupai students and families sued the BIE for “longstanding educational deprivations.” A judge ruled in an ongoing case that the BIE violated its responsibility to provide students with disabilities education through services like individualized special education plans.

The suit was filed in January 2017 by students and their families at Havasupai Elementary School, which sits on the Havasupai reservation at the bottom of the Grand Canyon. It accused the federally operated school of “longstanding educational deprivations,” including chronic understaffing that forced educators to cover as many as three grades at once and the denial of special education services.

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Federal Education Programs Rely Heavily On Funding Backed By Census Data

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Good morning, L.A.

As elected officials and activists alike call for redirecting public funds away from law enforcement and towards unarmed, trained service providers, one model that shows significant promise is peer support for people experiencing a mental health crisis.

At peer-run centers – which are, at the moment, few and far between in L.A. – folks who live with mental illness can show up and find resources, a sympathetic ear, or just a quiet place to decompress. My colleague Robert Garrova visited one such facility, the county-operated Peer Resource Center near Wilshire Blvd. and Vermont Ave., and discovered a welcoming and safe space.

“You don’t have to have a diagnosis to come in, we don’t ask for insurance,” said Joey Arcangel, a program coordinator at a different center. Instead, visitors can talk

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Plan for Higher Education Would Fuel “Degree Inflation,” Further Federal Takeover

When addressing the very real issues of rising student loan debt and unaffordable tuition prices, former Vice President Joe Biden’s policy solutions embrace the false promise of “free college.”  

The Biden campaign recently released “The Biden Plan for Education Beyond High School,” which details many proposals the plan’s authors suggest are the cure for fixing our broken higher education system.

Unfortunately, the plan will do nothing to reverse the drivers of tuition inflation, but rather, will fuel degree inflation.

The most noteworthy proposals within the former vice president’s policy blueprint is to make both two-year and four-year colleges and universities tuition-free, embracing the policies of both former President Barack Obama and Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt. 

Under the proposal, all public community colleges would be tuition-free, and all four-year public colleges and universities would be tuition-free for families making under $125,000 annually.

Tuition-free community college, as well as tuition-free four-year college,

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New education partnership secures federal funding for Whitecap students



a group of people sitting at a table: Saskatoon Public Schools' Board Chair Colleen MacPherson and Whitecap Dakota First Nation Chief Darcy Bear sign an  agreement supporting their ongoing education partnership.


© Provided by Star Phoenix
Saskatoon Public Schools’ Board Chair Colleen MacPherson and Whitecap Dakota First Nation Chief Darcy Bear sign an agreement supporting their ongoing education partnership.

A new agreement between Whitecap Dakota First Nation, the Saskatoon public school division and the federal government provides federal funding to support Whitecap students.

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The tripartite education agreement, signed on Tuesday morning, builds on an existing partnership between the First Nation and the school division that’s been in place since 2014.

The original partnership, extended by another five years in 2019, formalizes decades of collaboration between the division and Whitecap.

The school division operates the pre-Kindergarten to Grade 4 Charles Red Hawk Elementary School, located on the Whitecap Dakota First Nation. It’s the first on-reserve school to be part of a Saskatchewan school division.

Once students reach Grade 5, they are transported to Chief Whitecap School in Saskatoon’s Stonebridge neighbourhood,

Read More

Plan for Higher Ed Would Fuel ‘Degree Inflation,’ Further Federal Takeover

When addressing the very real issues of rising student loan debt and unaffordable tuition prices, former Vice President Joe Biden’s policy solutions embrace the false promise of “free college.”  

The Biden campaign recently released “The Biden Plan for Education Beyond High School,” which details many proposals the plan’s authors suggest are the cure for fixing our broken higher education system.

Unfortunately, the plan will do nothing to reverse the drivers of tuition inflation, but rather, will fuel degree inflation.

The most noteworthy proposals within the former vice president’s policy blueprint is to make both two-year and four-year colleges and universities tuition-free, embracing the policies of both former President Barack Obama and Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt. 

Under the proposal, all public community colleges would be tuition-free, and all four-year public colleges and universities would be tuition-free for families making under $125,000 annually.

Tuition-free community college, as well as tuition-free four-year college,

Read More

COABE, 100+ Partners Mark National Adult Education and Family Literacy Week With Call for $1B in Federal Funding

WASHINGTON, Sept. 21, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — Joined by more than 100 state, national and corporate partners, including Amazon, Google and IBM, the National Coalition on Adult Basic Education (COABE) is intensifying its effort during National Adult Education and Family Literacy Week to secure $1 billion in federal funding to help adult education programs and their learners recover from the pandemic.

National Adult Education and Family Literacy Week began Sunday and runs through Saturday, Sept. 26. During this week, COABE is spearheading a full schedule of activities designed to amplify the call on Congress to provide the additional funding and on state governors to allocate federal Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security Act (CARES) stimulus funding to the adult education recovery.

The call for additional funding comes at a time when the education and skills provided by the nation’s system of adult education are needed to help reskill or upskill

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