Pearson sales fall despite rise in online courses

Penguin books
Penguin books on a shelf. Last year Pearson struck a £530m deal to sell its stake in Penguin Random House. Photo: Stefan Wermuth/Reuters

Sales at education giant Pearson (PSON.L) fell 10% in the three months to September as a slump in its textbook and testing business eclipsed a rise in online learning.

It was the third consecutive quarter of decline, but an improvement on the second quarter’s 28% fall.

The FTSE 100 publisher, which is transitioning from traditional textbooks to digital, has suffered from tumbling sales this year as schools and testing centres shut in response to the COVID-19 pandemic.

However, digital revenue did manage to soften the pandemic blow as its online education business posted a 32% increase.

Enrolment in virtual schools jumped 41% in the first nine months of the year but overall sales were 14% lower in the period compared with 2019.

Watch: What is a recession?

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More Than 70% Of CPS Bilingual Programs Fall Short

Christopher Perea Ortega, an eighth grader at John Spry elementary on Chicago’s Southwest Side, loves to play guitar and the bass, especially when he is anxious.

Lately, that’s been happening a lot to deal with the stress of sitting at his computer for remote school and trying to understand his teachers in English.

Christopher’s parents only speak in Spanish to their children at home. The shy 14-year-old with a quirky sense of humor was in his school’s transitional bilingual program from kindergarten to fourth grade. He received language support to help transition from learning in Spanish to learning fully in English.

It’s been very rocky, said his mother, Nury Ortega.

“[The program] was really frustrating for us since kindergarten,” Ortega said in Spanish. “We had to make improvements in Spanish, but also in English. … We were told at school that in fourth grade, nobody will speak to him in

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Annie Malone Center helping special needs children not fall behind in virtual learning | News Headlines

ST. LOUIS (KMOV.com) — Online learning is hard enough for kids, but parents with students with special needs say their children are getting left behind. 

One local organization is working to keep those kids pressing ahead.

Carnadria Smith says it was the fear of her special needs son falling behind that had her concerned during the coronavirus shutdown.

“I’m not a therapist, I’m just mommy,” said Smith.

She’s one of many parents with concerns over virtual learning for students who need alternative learning.

 “Him trying to get through virtual learning, I didn’t know how to navigate that,” she said.  

Her 11-year-old son suffers from Oppositional Defiance Disorder.

Kylann Clayborn is Smith son’s teacher at the Emerson Therapeutic Academy and says during the three months of virtual learning, he saw a significant drop in how student were performing.

“Not being able to sit right there and hold their hand through the

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College faculty, admins feel prepared for fall online learning – Page 2 of 2

Teaching Online

  • The overwhelming majority of faculty (84 percent) and administrators (96 percent) agree that they are prepared to teach online this fall.
  • Faculty at two-year and four-year private colleges feel more prepared to teach online than faculty at four-year public institutions – 88 percent versus 81 percent.
  • Faculty and administrators at all types of institutions had access to multiple types of professional development – webinars, self-paced trainings, online resources, and more – and found them to be effective.

Confidence in the Future

Nearly half of faculty and administrators across all institution types are optimistic about the future of higher education, but there is still room for improvement.

When it comes to the future of higher education, 46 percent of administrators are optimistic, 23 percent are pessimistic, and 31 percent are neutral. Forty-two percent of faculty are optimistic, 31 percent are pessimistic, and 27 percent neutral.

Educators are also optimistic

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College faculty, admins feel prepared for fall online learning

U.S. higher education faculty and administrators agree that they are prepared to teach online this fall, and while questions remain, they are optimistic about the future of higher education.

This sentiment and others are explored in the second edition of the Digital Learning Pulse Survey, an ongoing four-part series to better understand the needs of colleges in the wake of the transformative disruption brought on by COVID-19.

The survey of 887 faculty and administrators at 597 institutions was conducted by Bay View Analytics on behalf of the Online Learning Consortium (OLC), WICHE Cooperative for Educational Technologies (WCET), University Professional and Continuing Education Association (UPCEA), Canadian Digital Learning Research Association (CDLRA) and primary partner and underwriter Cengage.

Related content: Why online learning is here to stay

“Compared to our initial research in April, this second survey shows a marked increase in the level of confidence of higher education faculty and administrators.

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Opinion | What We Can Learn From the Rise and Fall of ‘Political Blackness’

What about the ADOS movement? If ADOS activists flounder — they have fixed their gaze on slavery reparations and are intent that the wrong people don’t get in on the action — it will be because their certain-Black-lives-matter-more approach proves politically misjudged. An ambitious goal like reparations may require broad support, and in turn a broad conception of “Black.” Skeptics might think that, as with the prospectors and fortune hunters of “The Treasure of the Sierra Madre,” ADOS’s determination to keep the rewards for themselves imperils the chances of anyone getting them.

By contrast, let’s say you’re concerned about colorism. You might have been among those who were indignant when Zoe Saldana, a light-skinned Black woman, was cast in a biopic about Nina Simone, a dark-skinned Black woman. But if you want to talk about such prejudice, you’ll have to insist on one of the ways in which all Black

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Pandemic impacts rippling across higher education – News – The Herald News, Fall River, MA

BOSTON == The COVID-19 pandemic has presented colleges and universities with financial challenges that will likely extend for multiple years and may not be sustainable for all institutions, heads of public and private universities told state lawmakers Tuesday.

“We don’t view this as a one-year deal,” University of Massachusetts President Marty Meehan told the Higher Education Committee. “We view this as a two- to three- to four-year deal, and I will say Madam Chairman, there are universities and colleges in New England who won’t survive this. What we’re trying to do at UMass is make sure at the end of this crisis that we still have five UMass campuses that are all nationally ranked and that are successful.”

The committee, chaired by Sen. Anne Gobi and Rep. Jeff Roy, heard virtual testimony from state education officials, the Massachusetts Teachers Association, and heads of community colleges and private and public universities

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D128 Community Education offers variety of fall programs

Since 1948, the Community High School District 128 Community Education program has provided lifelong learning opportunities for adults, youth and families. This fall, school may look different in many ways, but the D128 Community Education program is continuing to offer programs both in-person and with live online class formats.

The District 128 Community Education program will continue to put students’ safety first during the COVID-19 pandemic. Community Education students who choose to participate in a class that meets in-person will follow safety procedures established by Community High School District 128 that include a temperature check when entering the building, wearing a mask at all times, hand-washing and social distancing.

        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        

 

Partnerships with local businesses are an important element in the success of the program. The district continues to offer the District 214 Community Education Travel Program, offering group travel to all seven continents along with area day trips. Planning is currently

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United Education Institute Opening New Las Vegas Campus This Fall

LAS VEGAS, Sept. 24, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — Clark County will have improved access to educational opportunities with United Education Institute (UEI) opening a new campus location in Las Vegas at the Boulevard Mall (3450 S. Maryland Pkwy) this fall. UEI is an accredited institution that offers a range of vocational and trade programs to help students get started in a new career in as little as 10 months. The new campus is approximately 35,000 square-feet and includes classrooms, training labs, computer labs and a student resource center. The first cohort of students will start in Las Vegas on October 26.

“UEI has been providing access to post-secondary education for over 35 years in California, and we look forward to being a contributing member of the Las Vegas community, helping students achieve their education and career goals, and providing employers with the essential workers they need to meet

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Some students could ‘fall through the cracks’ without in-person learning

Bill Ernzen’s 17-year-old daughter Nicola Ernzen has been frustrated with learning online.

Nicola, who was diagnosed with autism at 5 years old, misses the daily routine of waking up, taking her medicine, eating breakfast, and going to school to see her teachers and friends. Adjusting to learning online has been hard, and the Bloomfield Township teen’s family is worried her educational needs won’t be met.

“In the spring, we thought issues with this transition would be temporary and resolved by the fall,” he said. “But it was clear that, when we started the school year, that there were a great many things that hadn’t been figured out.”

Michigan doesn’t have centralized guidelines for teaching high-needs kids online. Each school district must create its own education plan. And many parents and education experts have concerns that some students could be left behind this school year.

“These students need extra attention. You

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