Future Gold Coast: Bulletin series looks at challenges facing tourism, health, education, real estate, manufacturing and entertainment

THE Gold Coast Bulletin is launching the next instalment in its Future Gold Coast series, bringing the city’s leaders together to capitalise on opportunities for the Gold Coast in a post-COVID era.

Future Gold Coast (Reset) will look at the challenges and opportunities across a range of sectors, including tourism, health, education, real estate, manufacturing and entertainment.

The series follows the highly successful Future Gold Coast event last year which examined what the Gold Coast needed to position itself for 2030.

FUTURE GOLD COAST FORUM: BERNARD SALT SAYS COAST NEEDS MAJOR INFRASTRUCTURE

Bulletin Editor Rachel Hancock speaks at last year’s Future Gold Coast event. Picture: Mike Batterham.
media_cameraBulletin Editor Rachel Hancock speaks at last year’s Future Gold Coast event. Picture: Mike Batterham.

GOLD COAST HEALTH PRECINCT: THE NORTH’S BIG JOB CREATOR

Bulletin editor Rachel Hancock said the campaign would focus on the Gold Coast now, and the many opportunities that had arisen since the coronavirus pandemic hit.

“No doubt the pandemic has hit the

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10 post-COVID policy issues facing education

A new report from the Aurora Institute examines the top 10 K-12 education policy issues that have surfaced in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic.

The report, Education Policy Issues for the COVID-19 Era: Policy Actions and Responses to Leverage the Moment for Future Readiness, offers insight into effecting high-level systematic change for the future of teaching and learning.

“Calls for a redesigned education system are growing in number and volume,” says Susan Patrick, Aurora Institute President and CEO and report co-author. “In this unprecedented time, we will do well to acknowledge that our long and firmly held beliefs about school, teaching, and learning will never be the same again. Our educators and students have a daunting year ahead as the pandemic persists. We are fortunate to have the liberty to seize the moment, share strategic guidance on education policy issues to rewrite the narrative, and fundamentally reshape this public

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Coronavirus: Care leavers are facing ‘digital poverty’ with no online access to education or work, campaigners say. | UK News

Care leavers are facing “digital poverty” without laptops or access to the internet, campaigners say.

A government scheme to provide digital devices and internet access to vulnerable young people in England during the pandemic is set to end in November.

Charities say it risks leaving up to 80,000 18-25 year-old care leavers isolated and unable to access education and work or to keep in touch with friends and family.

In an open letter to ministers, leading charities and youth organisations including Barnardo’s and The Children’s Society have called on the government to extend the scheme and ensure every care leaver gets internet access for at least 12 months when they first live independently.

They’ve described the move to stop the scheme as a “backward step”.

The letter reads: “Taking it away would not only be a backwards step, but would have a potentially damaging effect on these young care leavers’

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School Districts Are Facing Chromebook Shortages as Students Shift to Online Learning

Toni L. Sandys/The Washington Post via Getty

School districts are facing difficulty securing Chromebooks for students this year due to supply shortages amid the coronavirus pandemic.

With students across the country starting the school year at home, laptops and computers have become necessities to participate in classes or do coursework. Chromebooks — which run on Google’s Chrome operating system — have been a popular choice for students thanks to their low-price range. While high-end Chromebooks can cost hundreds of dollars, the most affordable models run just under $300.

But communities have been struck with Chromebook shortages over the last few weeks, due to high, nationwide demand for the machines and a slowdown in production.

According to the Associated Press, Lenovo, HP and Dell — three companies that make their own versions of Chromebooks — have said they will be short 5 million laptop units this year. The outlet said the

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