Seattle-area parents want rules about screen time, but experts say off-screen interactions matter more

Karla Petersen had a gut-level feeling that staring at screens all day was harming her kids.

The single mom had to help seven kids manage up to 32 separate daily log-ons to schooling platforms. Space in their Northgate home was limited. The district-provided Wi-Fi hotspot booted them offline and out of class up to six times an hour. And remote learning was stoking anxiety in the kids, who were already coping with trauma.

So Petersen redesigned school. She let her live-in kids, who range in age from 6 to 17, log in at their own discretion and supplemented with her own loose curriculum of on-the-fly adventures: scavenger hunts in the park (physical education), gardening (biology), and, most recently, a unit on caring for animals, courtesy of two local guinea pigs who needed a new home.

As Washington families continue to adapt to the mess of a pandemic, they’re struggling to

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As Election Looms, Experts Say Stakes Are High for Harvard and Higher Ed | News

With just three weeks before Election Day, experts say much is at stake for Harvard in the outcome of the contest between President Donald J. Trump and former Vice President Joseph R. Biden Jr.

University President Lawrence S. Bacow said in a Sept. 25 interview with The Crimson that he would not speculate on the outcome of the election and that the University will always try to “work cooperatively with the government, regardless of who is in power.”

But in recent months, the relationship between Harvard and Trump has been more contentious than cooperative.

In April, Trump said that Harvard would have to “pay back” the nearly $9 million it was allocated in the CARES Act, the largest economic stimulus package in American history. Soon after his criticism, Harvard announced that it would not “seek or accept” the funds to which it was entitled.

In July, shortly after Harvard announced

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Parents, experts worry that online learning is exacerbating the digital divide

When schools shut down last spring, Nero Persaud balanced working from home and her two children’s remote-learning needs by “playing musical chairs” with her older laptop and iPad.

But after deciding to enrol her son and daughter in online schooling this fall, the Toronto mother signed up to borrow devices from the school board because she knew they would all require their own computers.

“The device has become a standard part of the educational arsenal, the same way as books and pencils,” said Ms. Persaud, a single parent who works in marketing.

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Despite efforts by school boards to provide computers to students who need them for virtual schooling, many parents and experts worry the expansion of e-learning is exacerbating the gap between families who have access to computers and broadband internet and those who do not.

“The digital divide is real,” said Beyhan Farhadi, a post-doctoral

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Bombay HC asks NCERT to verify credentials of experts before enlisting help for special education





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The Bombay high court (HC) has asked the ministry of education and the National Council for Education, Research and Training (NCERT) to verify the credentials of the experts listed by the petitioner for finding a way to provide education for specially-abled children in over 900 special schools across the state.

A division bench of chief justice Dipankar Datta and justice GS Kulkarni, while hearing a public interest litigation (PIL) filed by the National Association of Blind (NAB), was informed by advocate Dr Uday Warunkjikar that as per court directions, he had prepared a list of experts who could provide a solution to the problem of education for specially-abled students.

In an earlier hearing, Dr Warunjikar had informed the court that while education for normal students had commenced through virtual classrooms, the same was not viable for specially-abled students, and urged that the state and Centre

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Education Department’s child abuse outreach during Covid doesn’t go far enough, experts say | Us World News

(CNN) — The US Department of Education’s muted response to concerns about unreported child abuse in the age of virtual learning is fueling new distress among family welfare experts and advocates.

The Education Department declined to tell CNN on the record what steps have been taken to help teachers or other members of school communities spot signs of child abuse through a webcam during virtual teaching. Instead, a department spokesperson pointed to a series of online resources created by local and state education agencies that they help to make public.

That lack of federal guidance has set off alarm bells for experts.

“Clearly just posting resources on a website is not enough,” said Maureen Kenny Winick, a Florida International University professor whose expertise includes child maltreatment.

“Sometimes accessing what you need takes many clicks and teachers may have more immediate concerns about academics and distance learning right now.”

The concern

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Education Department’s child abuse outreach during Covid doesn’t go far enough, experts say

The US Department of Education’s muted response to concerns about unreported child abuse in the age of virtual learning is fueling new distress among family welfare experts and advocates.



Betsy DeVos wearing glasses and looking at the camera


© Alex Wong/Getty Images


The Education Department declined to tell CNN on the record what steps have been taken to help teachers or other members of school communities spot signs of child abuse through a webcam during virtual teaching. Instead, a department spokesperson pointed to a series of online resources created by local and state education agencies that they help to make public.

That lack of federal guidance has set off alarm bells for experts.

“Clearly just posting resources on a website is not enough,” said Maureen Kenny Winick, a Florida International University professor whose expertise includes child maltreatment.

“Sometimes accessing what you need takes many clicks and teachers may have more immediate concerns about academics and distance learning right

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Charlie Baker, education experts want students in schools before second coronavirus surge strikes

State education officials are urging districts with low virus rates to get students back to class for in-person instruction now before a second surge of coronavirus afflicts the state.

“We know the possibility of a second spike exists, but while we are in a situation where a district has been green or gray for many weeks, we are asking districts to bring kids back to school in-person, or in a hybrid model,” education commissioner Jeffrey Riley said.

Only districts listed in red — or highest risk — on the Baker administration’s coronavirus risk map for three consecutive weeks should stick with remote-only learning, both Riley and Gov. Charlie Baker have said. There are currently 15 communities at the highest risk level.

“We think kids should be in school and think communities should be following the rules and guidance that was developed by the department and using the district-by-district data that

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Coronavirus Impact: Online classes don’t offer same benefits as in person learning, experts say

SAN FRANCISCO (KGO) — Distance learning is getting disappointing marks from some educators and from the Center for Education Reform, which found that many students are not getting the feedback and engagement they need.

Having too many students at once on Google Meet or Zooming is robbing children of the opportunity to engage or get the proper feedback from teachers. That’s what Karen Aronian an education expert found when analyzing remote classes at some public schools.

“We’re seeing children who whether they are elevated in their learning or below in their learning and even midline, coming in way below with this type of offering.” Aronian said.

She says students are competing for the teacher’s attention when school districts could have hired more staff during the summer when it became apparent that they would start the fall learning online.

“That needed to be a call of action so early in this

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Closed schools have to serve some special education students in person, experts say

Out of all the students struggling with distance learning, students with disabilities need in-person services the most, some San Diego parents and advocates say.

Many special education services — such as hands-on occupational therapy or a one-on-one aide — can’t be replicated well online, parents say. Some are reporting that their children simply aren’t learning and that Zoom is too distracting and impersonal.

Meg Menard, a Tierrasanta mom of a 6-year-old boy with autism who attends Elevate Elementary charter school, said she sits with her son throughout his Zoom classes and reminds him to sit up and pay attention every few seconds. At the same time, she takes care of her three other children and works on a master’s degree.

“He doesn’t want to pay attention to Zoom,” she said of her son. “He doesn’t want to sit down and stare at his iPad…. I have to keep telling him

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Sexual Health Week 2020: 7 of the biggest taboos for young people, according to experts

D

espite the plethora of information about sex on the internet, its prevalence on television and in film, and word of mouth dating back to the beginning of time, the fact remains that conversations about sex are often shrouded in stigma and misconception.

This is particularly pertinent when discussing sexual health education among young people, who may feel embarrassed to ask questions on the subject or do not have access to sexual health and relationships education that is inclusive and up-to-date.

From Monday 14 September to Sunday 20 September, sexual health charity Brook is holding its annual Sexual Health Week with the aim of increasing awareness of the importance of sexual health education.

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