Hoonuit Introduces Digital Learning Analytics Dashboards to Help Educators Uncover Digital Learning Engagement and its Impact on Student Success

MINNEAPOLIS, Oct. 13, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — Hoonuit, a leading provider of data management and analytics solutions in education, announced today the introduction of new analytics that provide educators actionable insights about digital learning engagement. Hoonuit’s Digital Learning Analytics dashboards are part of its Essentials Analytics solution suite and available to all K-12 districts nationwide.

Since the onset of school closures due to COVID-19, there has been a significant surge in usage of virtual tutoring, video conferencing, and online learning software. Further, digital learning will be a fundamental component of schooling for the foreseeable future as social distancing requirements complicate traditional teaching. As a result, Hoonuit partnered with experts from both the data and academic support teams of its district clients to unearth the most meaningful and actionable insights from digital learning data. From that research three key questions emerged:

  • Which students have access to learning in a remote environment?
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Educators need time for online learning to be effective

Albert D. Ritzhaupt
 |  Guest columnist

I have been teaching online for more than 15 years and my research agenda broadly focuses on learning in technology-enhanced environments, including online learning. While I do not claim to be an expert and fully admit I do not have all of the answers, I believe this perspective will help us better understand the challenges facing both students and educators right now.

What we witnessed this past March as schools and universities closed their face-to-face operations and quickly pivoted to emergency remote teaching in response to the COVID-19 pandemic does not represent the qualities of effective online learning. I don’t believe it is fair for us to judge hard-working educators based on this single experience or to judge the merits of online learning.

Although online learning continues to steadily grow in the United States, most educators have never taught online and were suddenly challenged

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US Dept of Education Supports Initiative to Give Educators More Power in Edtech Decision-Making

RALEIGH, N.C., Oct. 6, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — LearnPlatform, which is now used by schools and districts serving more than 4 million students to organize, streamline and analyze their edtech, today announced that it has received a second federal grant to expand a program that helps educators share information, and make better-informed decisions, about the education technology tools they use in their classrooms.

The U.S. Department of Education’s Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) program, through the research-focused Institute of Education Sciences (IES), has awarded $874,803 to the Learn – Implementation in Context (Learn-IXC) initiative, a project led by LearnPlatform, to understand the context in which technologies work best. LearnPlatform, whose edtech effectiveness system is widely adopted by educators, districts and states, is a for-benefit research organization committed to expanding equitable access for all students to the teaching and technology that works best for them.

This is the second time IES

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Commentary: Online teaching doesn’t have to suck for students or educators

SINGAPORE: Every week I read about another university in the United States forced to abandon in-person instruction due to a sudden rise in coronavirus cases: UNC-Chapel Hill, Notre Dame, James Madison.

This sudden change of direction has taken a toll on students, who are now restricted to remote instruction and self-isolation after moving to campus only weeks before.

It has also impacted faculty members, now forced to redesign their modules in the midst of the semester.

Here in Singapore, I have been planning for online teaching since May, when the NUS Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences made the controversial decision to offer nearly every course online this semester.

STARTING EARLY

The decision was unpopular with many colleagues, including me. After all, nearly everyone prefers face-to-face instruction.

READ: Commentary: How ready are Singapore universities to start the new term as COVID-19 rages on?

READ: Commentary: Home-based

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COVID-19 and schools: Advice from Houston educators to parents struggling with helping kids learn from home

HOUSTON, Texas (KTRK) — Virtual learning is well underway for many school children across Southeast Texas, and some school districts have returned to in-person instruction, like Fort Bend ISD.

Fort Bend ISD Superintendent Dr. Charles Dupre said some students need an in-person learning environment to thrive.

“We have many students [that] need more direct interaction, those kinds of things,” he said.

But many parents, for whom virtual learning is the only option, are struggling to balance their new roles as teachers and technology experts with their already-existing responsibilities.

Kinsey Wall, a mother of two boys who attend a Houston ISD school, said her family is doing their best to support the children, but that it can be challenging.

SEE ALSO: 4 tips to help you manage working from home as kids learn from home

“I’m the tech support for the Wall family,” she said. “If I’m struggling to find things

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How These 6 Educators Are Integrating Antiracist Education Into Their Classrooms

Lorena German, Angela Censoplano, Oriana Miles, HelloGiglges

2020 has proven to be a pivotal year for education. The pandemic and the resurgence of the Black Lives Matter movement has altered our thinking about the role of schools in times of crisis. Widespread calls for education reform have prompted educators to examine their approach to addressing race, white privilege, and Black and Indigenous history in the classroom. This is because studies, like from Indiana University and Rutgers University, have proven that Black students are more likely to be suspended and expelled, are subject to lower expectations from teachers, and are less likely to be placed in gifted programs. 

But many teachers aren’t just waiting on state school boards to take action; they are rewriting their lesson plans to respond to our current political moment. HelloGiggles sat down with six educators from across the country to discuss how they plan to integrate

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How These 6 Educators Are Integrating Anti-Racist Education Into Their Classroom

Lorena German, Angela Censoplano, Oriana Miles, HelloGiglges

2020 has proven to be a pivotal year for education. The pandemic and the resurgence of the Black Lives Matter movement has altered our thinking about the role of schools in times of crisis. Widespread calls for education reform have prompted educators to examine their approach to addressing race, white privilege, and Black and Indigenous history in the classroom. This is because studies, like from Indiana University and Rutgers University, have proven that Black students are more likely to be suspended and expelled, are subject to lower expectations from teachers, and are less likely to be placed in gifted programs. 

But many teachers aren’t just waiting on state school boards to take action, they are rewriting their lesson plans to respond to our current political moment. HelloGiggles sat down with six educators from across the country to discuss how they plan to integrate

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These Educators Embrace the Opportunities of Online Learning

At the start of the year, some educators were still making slow, reluctant strides toward embracing technology in the classroom. That quickly changed for many in March. Now, e-learning is the reality for schools across the country. Ready or not, educators have had to quickly figure out how to move classes online and improve the quality of remote instruction.

That’s what’s happening now. But many educators and other experts in the field had already fully embraced educational technology. Now they have their eyes on the future and the potential impact of emerging technologies. They are innovators. They also understand the power of social media to share ideas.

EdTech highlighted 30 of them in its list of 2020 K–12 IT Influencers. Here are three tweets that help illustrate why these educators shine.

This Digital Tool Helps Develop Language Skills

Esther Park, a high school teacher of English for Speakers of Other

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