Key ways Sullivan and Hayes differ on the economy and education in the coronavirus crisis


The coronavirus crisis that continues to stifle jobs and schools across the nation is a key dividing line in the race for Connecticut’s most competitive congressional district.

A New Fairfield prosecutor trying to be the first Republican to represent the 5th District since 2006 says the direction voters wanted when they elected Donald Trump president in 2016 is the way out of the COVID-19 crisis for people in northwestern and central Connecticut.


But U.S. Rep. Jahana Hayes says the correction voters wanted when they elected her and a Democratic majority to the House of Representatives in 2018 is the way to help schools in need and get the economy back on its feet in Connecticut.

Republican challenger David X. Sullivan, a retired assistant

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The best medicine for a COVID-19 economy? More education and training

Reading the tea leaves of a U.S. economy reshaped by COVID-19 has sent economic analysts and prognosticators into overdrive. Many see a move away from big cities and into simpler, socially distanced life in small towns. If this happens at scale, it could be a boon to heretofore “left-behind” places in the Midwest and other regions.

Others predict significant drops in demand for jobs with low education and training requirements, driven by automation and the growth of technology needed to operate socially distanced offices, warehouses, manufacturing facilities and even restaurants. A recently released analysis by the Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia lends support to this idea.

Policymakers can adopt policies to help improve wages and opportunities in jobs with fewer credentialing requirements, for example by helping smaller manufacturers and boosting the minimum wage. But policy also needs to directly address the need for more workers with higher skills due both

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Opinion | September jobs report shows U.S. economy missing more jobs now than it did at worst point of any prior postwar recession

Here’s the bad news: The nation’s payrolls are still down 10.7 million jobs, or about 7 percent, since their peak in February, when the recession began. That’s enormous. In fact, a higher net share of jobs is still “missing” today, relative to pre-recession times, than was the case even at the worst period of any prior postwar downturn.

The chart below shows percentage changes in employment since the recession began, and how recent trends compare with other postwar downturns and recoveries. The black line plots the Great Recession and its aftermath. At the very worst point for the job market in that business cycle, payrolls were down about 6.3 percent. Now, however, the magnitude of those Great Recession job losses looks slightly less “great” when compared with more recent changes in employment, plotted by the red line.

Another measure of labor market health, the unemployment rate, tells a barely more

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Major expansion of post-18 education and training to level up and prepare workers for post-COVID economy

  • Lifetime Skills Guarantee to give adults the chance to take free college courses valued by employers
  • New entitlement to flexible loans to allow courses to be taken in segments, boosting opportunities to retrain and enhancing the nation’s technical skills
  • PM acts to boost productivity and help the country build back better from coronavirus

The Prime Minister will today set out plans to transform the training and skills system, making it fit for the 21st century economy, and helping the country build back better from coronavirus.

Adults without an A-Level or equivalent qualification will be offered a free, fully-funded college course – providing them with skills valued by employers, and the opportunity to study at a time and location that suits them.

This offer will be available from April in England, and will be paid for through the National Skills Fund. A full list of available courses will be set out

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Biden’s education plan would help yield a stronger economy versus Trump’s

Joe Biden’s plans for education would dent the U.S. budget — especially compared with President Donald Trump’s — but the spending would be a key factor in boosting the economy even more, according to a new analysis from Moody’s Analytics.

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“Biden and Trump are night and day on their commitment to supporting education,” Mark Zandi, Moody’s chief economist, told Yahoo Finance. “Biden is all in on it and Trump is AWOL.”

Zandi and Bernard Yaros, another Moody’s economist, quantified the economic impact of four scenarios where Trump became president, with and without a Republican-controlled Congress, as well as a Biden administration, with and without a Democrat-controlled Congress. 

A Democratic sweep, followed by government spending just for Biden’s education plans alone, would cause a budget deficit of $636.3 billion between 2021 and 2024, the analysts calculated. A Trump administration would save the government $52.2 billion between the same period.

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