Matrics: Don’t Delay Your Higher Education Applications

With about 30 days left before the start of the 2020 Matric exams, the focus of Grade 12s is now firmly on the final preparation for this important milestone. But they should also take some time to finalise their Higher Education plans for next year, as the clock is ticking on closing dates for applications.

“Matrics cannot wait until they receive their results – currently scheduled for release on February 23 next year – before applying, as this will most likely mean they miss out on a space at their institution and for their qualification of choice as deadlines at many institutions are still in place,” says Peter Kriel, General Manager at The Independent Institute of Education, SA’s largest and most accredited private higher education institution.

“Beyond a later start to the higher education academic year it is still not clear what else higher education will need to do in

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Young People Care About Elections, They Just Don’t Always Show Up to Vote. Here’s How Education Can Help.

It’s election season in the U.S., and get-out-the-vote efforts are in full swing. And one question being asked by pundits and politicos is, how can we motivate young voters to show up at the polls?

After all, in the most recent presidential election, less than half of citizens ages 18 to 29 participated, compared to 71 percent of those 65 and older and 67 percent of eligible voters ages 45 to 64..

But a book published earlier this year by two political scientists tweaks that question. Young people are already plenty motivated to vote, the authors say, but they don’t always follow through to cast ballots. So this book asks, what is it that prevents young people from actually voting?

The answer has implications for political campaigns, policymakers and of course for educators. The book, called “Making Young Voters,” offers a surprising insight about what kind of education actually influences

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Don’t join protests, Education Ministry says – National

The Education and Culture Ministry’s Higher Education directorate general issued a circular on Friday calling on university students not to take part in protests related to the controversial Job Creation Law and asking university leaders to promote the newly passed law.

“Considering the latest situation regarding the issuance of the Job Creation Law, we appeal to university students not to take part in any protest that could endanger the students’ health and safety during the pandemic,” the letter, signed by Higher Education director general Nizam, read.

The letter also asked university leaders to help promote the content of the jobs law and encourage academic studies of the law.

“Thoughts and aspirations from campuses should be conveyed to the government and the House in a polite manner,” the letter continued.

Read also: Problems in jobs law not only about labor sector: What we know so far

It also instructed lecturers not

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Don’t Give Gov. Newsom the Education Prize

California Gov. Gavin Newsom



Photo:

Carin Dorghalli/Associated Press

Your editorial “Hope for California’s Schools” (Oct. 2) gives Gov. Gavin Newsom too much credit. I fully suspect that he doesn’t want to sign anything that would be a cautionary, if not frightening, example of what will happen on a national level after the November elections if both the executive and legislative branches are controlled by the Democrats. I seriously doubt that the Legislature is reticent about the wording of the bill after Gov. Newsom’s veto message. I fully expect that postelection, no matter who wins, this issue will rise again, an equally egregious bill will pass and, absent an immediate threat of a negative election reaction, the governor will sign it.

Christopher Reid

Houston

California schools could well better educate and prepare their students for adult life if they abandoned their push for “ethnic studies”

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‘We don’t have any say.’ For TDSB’s adult learners chaotic planning and a lack of online options threatens to halt their education

Desrine Peters, 43, moved to Canada 10 years ago from Jamaica and had been working in security, but found there wasn’t much room for progress in the field. “I was finding myself not accomplishing my goals,” she said.

Peters is now a first-year student at Seneca College in the chemical lab technician program, and has plans to continue studying biochemistry. She credits her adult day school teachers with motivating her and encouraging her to continue her studies.

Two years ago she began taking classes at the TDSB’s Emery Adult Learning Centre to complete high school credits needed for her college program. When the COVID-19 pandemic created hiccups in education and moved things online in the spring, she finished that semester and took summer school so she would be able to continue to college this fall.

But for students who were looking to return to adult day school this quadmester, the

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Afua Hirsch: ‘Don’t sell off history with slave links

Afua Hirsch at Elmina Castle in Ghana
Afua Hirsch at Elmina Castle in Ghana

A presenter of a new documentary about slavery has rejected the idea of selling art and artefacts with links to the trade, to compensate descendants.

“I don’t think the sensible way to achieve reparation is to sell off national heritage,” Afua Hirsch said.

“I want people to see it and engage with it. The more accessible it can be, the more it can be used to educate.”

The writer and broadcaster is fronting Enslaved with actor Samuel L Jackson. The series starts on BBC Two on Sunday.

Samuel L Jackson and Afua Hirsch both discovered their roots on the show
Samuel L Jackson and Afua Hirsch both discovered their roots on the show

Hirsch, who writes a column for The Guardian and penned the book Brit(ish): On Race, Identity and Belonging, added: “I’m not about destroying history at all. I want people to see it and engage with it.

“But I do feel quite critical that

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More Than 70% of Students Who Fear Lower Grades Due to Online Learning Don’t Always Have Internet Access

WASHINGTON, Sept. 29, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — Seventy-one percent (71%) of students who expect lower grades than usual while learning remotely don’t always have access to high-speed internet, according to a new report from The Manifest, a business how-to and news website.

The survey accounts for 400 high school and college students’ impressions on remote learning in the fall 2020 semester.

Internet access is essential for students to attend classes, submit assignments, and collaborate with classmates. Students with limited access have already started to fall behind in class.

Accessibility disproportionately challenges Black, Latino, and Native American students, as well as those living in rural areas.

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More Than 70% of Students Who Fear Lower Grades Due to Online Learning Don’t Always Have Internet Access | News

WASHINGTON, Sept. 29, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — Seventy-one percent (71%) of students who expect lower grades than usual while learning remotely don’t always have access to high-speed internet, according to a new report from The Manifest, a business how-to and news website.

The survey accounts for 400 high school and college students’ impressions on remote learning in the fall 2020 semester.

Internet access is essential for students to attend classes, submit assignments, and collaborate with classmates. Students with limited access have already started to fall behind in class.

Accessibility disproportionately challenges Black, Latino, and Native American students, as well as those living in rural areas. Academic achievement gaps resulting from a lack of internet access will most severely impact these groups.

Students Expected to Purchase Expensive Back-to-School Tech Equipment

Expensive technological equipment is another barrier to entry for disadvantaged students participating in remote learning.

Students will need to purchase

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Christmas Abbott Asks Da’Vonne Rogers To ‘Educate’ Her About BLM; Fans Don’t Buy It

[SPOILER ALERT: Spoilers ahead for Big Brother 22.]

When Christmas Abbott nominated Bayleigh Dayton and Da’Vonne Rogers for eviction, she asked if they would get upset and “cut” or “shoot” her. Additionally, she has repeatedly claimed that the ladies “charged” her during their verbal argument in Big Brother 22 Week 5, although it never happened. Therefore, when Christmas asked Da’Vonne to “educate” her about Black Lives Matter only a day before the fan-favorite’s likely eviction, viewers aren’t buying it and believe she might have ulterior motives.

Houseguest Christmas Abbott to compete on this season of Big Brother
Houseguest Christmas Abbott to compete on this season of Big Brother | Sonja Flemming

Christmas Abbott and Da’Vonne Rogers got into an argument on ‘Big Brother 22’

During Week 5, Christmas Abbott barely beat out Da’Vonne Rogers to snag the title of Head of Household. After Dani Briones (formerly Donato) and Tyler Crispen previously planted the seeds that she should nominate Bayleigh Dayton

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What Retirees Don’t Know About Retirement Income Planning Does Hurt Them

Retirement is occurring at an unprecedented pace. Baby boomers have already been retiring in droves for the last several years, but compounding this demographic trend are the challenges created by the Covid-19 pandemic. For many individuals either at retirement or near-retirement age, unemployment has translated into permanent retirement. And, many of those working in essential industries such as teaching are voluntarily electing early retirement over exposure to the virus.  

With retirement under more pressure than ever before, how prepared and knowledgeable are Americans today? Based on one of the most comprehensive surveys of retirement income literacy ever conducted, the answer is that while many are confident they know what they need to know, a sizable majority of retirees and pre-retirees still fail to understand the basics of retirement. 

Survey Says: Four Out of Five Older Americans Fail Retirement Income Literacy Survey

The American College

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