Massachusetts poll: Race, education, gender may influence some divergent views about death

Last Words, a three-part Globe Spotlight Team series, exposes the inequities that follow people in Massachusetts to their very last breaths. It is a deep examination into the uncomfortable topic of death, and confronts the state’s failure to protect its most vulnerable in the early days of a historic pandemic. Read the Globe Spotlight report.

A Boston Globe-Suffolk University poll late last year shows that, for the most part, Massachusetts residents share widespread agreement on issues related to the difficult subject of death.

They say society would be better off if end-of-life issues were discussed more openly and believe terminally ill patients should have more options to choose when and how to die. A sizable majority say they would prefer to die at home, and many men and women have first-hand experience with hospice, according to the poll of some 500 residents across the state.

But some major —

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Race, education, gender may influence some divergent views about death

Last Words, a three-part Globe Spotlight Team series, exposes the inequities that follow people in Massachusetts to their very last breaths. It is a deep examination into the uncomfortable topic of death, and confronts the state’s failure to protect its most vulnerable in the early days of a historic pandemic. Read the Globe Spotlight report.



a person sitting at a table in front of a mirror: Danvers resident John Barbieri looks over a collage of photos of his late wife, Ann "Peachie" Barbieri. They were married for more than 60 years.


© Craig F. Walker/Globe Staff
Danvers resident John Barbieri looks over a collage of photos of his late wife, Ann “Peachie” Barbieri. They were married for more than 60 years.

A Boston Globe-Suffolk University poll late last year shows that, for the most part, Massachusetts residents share widespread agreement on issues related to the difficult subject of death.

They say society would be better off if end-of-life issues were discussed more openly and believe terminally ill patients should have more options to choose when and how to die. A sizable majority say they would

Read More