Education Department’s child abuse outreach during Covid doesn’t go far enough, experts say | Us World News

(CNN) — The US Department of Education’s muted response to concerns about unreported child abuse in the age of virtual learning is fueling new distress among family welfare experts and advocates.

The Education Department declined to tell CNN on the record what steps have been taken to help teachers or other members of school communities spot signs of child abuse through a webcam during virtual teaching. Instead, a department spokesperson pointed to a series of online resources created by local and state education agencies that they help to make public.

That lack of federal guidance has set off alarm bells for experts.

“Clearly just posting resources on a website is not enough,” said Maureen Kenny Winick, a Florida International University professor whose expertise includes child maltreatment.

“Sometimes accessing what you need takes many clicks and teachers may have more immediate concerns about academics and distance learning right now.”

The concern

Read More

Education Department’s child abuse outreach during Covid doesn’t go far enough, experts say

The US Department of Education’s muted response to concerns about unreported child abuse in the age of virtual learning is fueling new distress among family welfare experts and advocates.



Betsy DeVos wearing glasses and looking at the camera


© Alex Wong/Getty Images


The Education Department declined to tell CNN on the record what steps have been taken to help teachers or other members of school communities spot signs of child abuse through a webcam during virtual teaching. Instead, a department spokesperson pointed to a series of online resources created by local and state education agencies that they help to make public.

That lack of federal guidance has set off alarm bells for experts.

“Clearly just posting resources on a website is not enough,” said Maureen Kenny Winick, a Florida International University professor whose expertise includes child maltreatment.

“Sometimes accessing what you need takes many clicks and teachers may have more immediate concerns about academics and distance learning right

Read More

Houston Health Department’s COVID-19 antibody testing survey

The Houston Health Department announced a testing survey to understand how many people in the city were previously infected with the coronavirus.

HOUSTON — The Houston Health Department on Wednesday announced a COVID-19 antibody testing survey to better understand the spread of the virus in the city.

The survey, in collaboration with the CDC, Rice University and Baylor College of Medicine, will identify people previously infected with COVID-19 by the presence of antibodies, proteins the body’s immune system makes to fight infections. Antibody testing does not replace oral or nasal swab viral testing that looks for current COVID-19 infection.

Dr. David Persse, Houston Health Authority, said teams of HHD employees and and Houston Fire Department paramedics will visit randomly selected homes across the city. These teams will ask household members to answer survey questions and provide a blood sample.

Phase 1 is set to take place Sept. 8 to Sept.

Read More

What Does the Education Department’s New Final Rule Mean For Religion and Free Speech in Higher Education?


Last Wednesday, the U.S. Department of Education issued its final rule on religious liberty and free inquiry, which details protections for faith-based institutions and religious student groups at public universities and seeks to bolster campus free speech.

The rule reflects – and sometimes contradicts – a fraught, growing body of case law about religion and free speech in higher education.

Education Secretary Betsy DeVos

The final rule, which came after 17,000 public comments, requires universities to give equal treatment to religious student groups, which means equal access to university facilities, recognition and funding from student fees, among other things. The rule also defines what it means to be a religious higher education institution so that these schools can continue to be officially exempted from adhering to Title IX where it conflicts with a religious creed. Plus, it reaffirms that these institutions can benefit from department

Read More