A growing crisis in special education

Our daughter Mae is 4. She has Down syndrome, and we are fighting to keep her in school.

October is Down Syndrome Awareness Month, and in any other year we would work with friends, families, and organizations to fund-raise, advocate, and spread awareness for those who share Mae’s diagnosis.

But, of course, this is unlike any other year. As the uncertainty surrounding the coronavirus pandemic drags on, we have had to work harder than ever to advocate for basic educational rights and services for all children with special needs.

When schools began shutting down in March, families across the nation were faced with the reality that their children with special needs would lose the services and professional therapies that are provided through public school systems once a child reaches the age of 3.

More than seven months have passed since children have experienced a normal school day. Remote learning is

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A growing crisis is special education

Our daughter Mae is 4. She has Down syndrome, and we are fighting to keep her in school.

October is Down Syndrome Awareness Month, and in any other year we would work with friends, families, and organizations to fund-raise, advocate, and spread awareness for those who share Mae’s diagnosis.

But, of course, this is unlike any other year. As the uncertainty surrounding the coronavirus pandemic drags on, we have had to work harder than ever to advocate for basic educational rights and services for all children with special needs.

When schools began shutting down in March, families across the nation were faced with the reality that their children with special needs would lose the services and professional therapies that are provided through public school systems once a child reaches the age of 3.

More than seven months have passed since children have experienced a normal school day. Remote learning is

Read More

Key ways Sullivan and Hayes differ on the economy and education in the coronavirus crisis


The coronavirus crisis that continues to stifle jobs and schools across the nation is a key dividing line in the race for Connecticut’s most competitive congressional district.

A New Fairfield prosecutor trying to be the first Republican to represent the 5th District since 2006 says the direction voters wanted when they elected Donald Trump president in 2016 is the way out of the COVID-19 crisis for people in northwestern and central Connecticut.


But U.S. Rep. Jahana Hayes says the correction voters wanted when they elected her and a Democratic majority to the House of Representatives in 2018 is the way to help schools in need and get the economy back on its feet in Connecticut.

Republican challenger David X. Sullivan, a retired assistant

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In-person learning is a luxury months into the coronavirus crisis

Remote schooling remains a struggle for many families. Yet there is still a real risk in returning to the classroom.

As of a recent tally, 87% of institutions have combined in-person and virtual learning in response to the public health crisis, according to a report by the Institute of International Education that was based on data collected in July from more than 500 colleges and universities in the U.S. 

Now, months into the pandemic, the students who can learn in person are at an advantage, experts say.

The coronavirus outbreak laid bare how ill-prepared most schools had been when it came to remote learning. From grade school through graduate school, many institutions have struggled to provide the same level of education they did pre-Covid-19.

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Its Power of Resolving Crisis is What Makes Gandhism Relevant in Today’s Times



a man standing in front of a window: Its Power of Resolving Crisis is What Makes Gandhism Relevant in Today’s Times


© Provided by News18
Its Power of Resolving Crisis is What Makes Gandhism Relevant in Today’s Times

The essence of ‘Gandhi-ism’ is peace and nonviolence, extending but not limiting itself to goodness, creative thinking, and efficient admin. Certain quarters may subscribe to the idea that ‘Gandhism’ is not practicable in today’s world. In reality, the virtues preached and practiced by Mahatma Gandhi espouse the very eternal whose relevance transcend the barriers of time and geography.

This omnipresence in both temporal and spatial dimensions can be substantiated by the fact that it can serve as an ideal for movements in lands where human right were and are routinely abused. He rules in the inner consciousness of all conscientious people though most of us are either oblivious of this existence or simply choose to ignore. Gandhi as a personality is immense but far more gigantic is the philosophy that bears his name.

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Remember When We Thought Higher Ed Was ‘In Crisis’?

Still, looking back at the book, I realize that several issues I highlighted have become even more relevant over the past seven months — particularly the racial and economic disparities in educational opportunity and the potential and limits of online education. Meanwhile, some of the crucial issues bubbling up today — the “trust gap” between college leaders and faculty and staff members, for one — didn’t seem as “live-or-death” important in 2014.

I wasn’t as farsighted as another author, Bryan Alexander, who actually speculated on the potential effects of a pandemic in his early-2020 book, Academia Next. And I feel no sense of satisfaction in seeing fissures I called out six years ago deepening today. Frankly, it’s painful. But I do think re-examining where I thought the sector was headed — and what its biggest challenges were — could help us comprehend the current crisis and, eventually, dig out

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Faculty sharply question Adela de la Torre’s handling of SDSU’s COVID-19 crisis

It was a one-two punch many people saw coming. But it still shook San Diego State University.

Barely 10 days into the fall semester, SDSU pushed its face-to-face classes online due to a budding COVID-19 outbreak. A short time later, the school’s dorm students were told to go into quarantine during a heat wave.

President Adela de la Torre saw this as a way to protect students. Some of her faculty described it as an avoidable situation caused by poor leadership. And, in a rarity for SDSU, faculty are publicly and sharply questioning de la Torre’s ability to guide the university through a crisis in which nearly 1,000 of its students have tested positive for COVID-19.

That’s the highest of any college or university in California, says a New York Times survey.

“What was the purpose of putting 2,600 students in dorms? Was it just so they could take a

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Parents sue LAUSD, blasting its online learning as an ‘educational crisis’

The Los Angeles Unified School District’s distance learning plan has caused “enormous learning losses” and left tens of thousands of Black and Latino students without a basic education, according to allegations in a class action lawsuit filed against the district Thursday.



a group of people holding a sign: Parents, students and education activists hold a news conference to announce a lawsuit against the Los Angeles Unified School District. (Luis Sinco / Los Angeles Times)


© (Luis Sinco / Los Angeles Times)
Parents, students and education activists hold a news conference to announce a lawsuit against the Los Angeles Unified School District. (Luis Sinco / Los Angeles Times)

The lawsuit, filed on behalf of Los Angles public school parents, alleges that the district is failing students by offering less instructional time to students compared with other large districts in California and cutting the hours that teachers are required to work

“My daughter and the children of my community…they’ve been failed by the district,” said Judith Larson, a plaintiff in the suit whose daughter is in seventh grade at South Gate Middle School. “The

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