Ramsey County delays homeless shelter lease to address security concerns

The Ramsey County Board expressed strong support Tuesday morning for a plan to lease Bethesda Hospital and turn it into a homeless shelter, but delayed approval for a week to better address neighbors’ security concerns.

Commissioners spoke about the urgent need for more shelter space with winter fast approaching. Nearly 400 people recently have been sleeping outside in St. Paul, which is said to be a record.

The hospital building, just north of the State Capitol in the Frogtown neighborhood, would provide a 24-hour shelter and services for 100 homeless people. It would be a low-barrier shelter, meaning it would house people who have been unsuccessful in other shelter settings and are often battling addictions.

Neighbors have said they worry about increasing crime and drug activity, and also that a private park on the hospital grounds could be overrun by the homeless.

Commissioners vowed to address security concerns at Tuesday’s

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Social media use in distance learning raises privacy concerns

Dive Brief:

  • Connecting with students over social media raises equity and privacy concerns, The 74 reports. Though social media sites give teachers a convenient way to connect with students, children younger than 13 are prohibited from signing up for many social media platforms because they collect user data, which runs counter to the Children’s Online Privacy Protection Act (COPPA).
  • Students also may not have access to social media or they may have connectivity issues, making content streaming difficult, and the practice can also raise concerns about the potential for educator misconduct. 
  • Parents are concerned about the digital safety of students, as well, according to a report from the Center for Democracy and Technology that found 62% of parents reporting they are at least somewhat concerned about the privacy and security of data collected by schools, and only 40% saying their child’s school explained to them how it protects this information. 
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Texas teachers concerns mount as school start nears

There is a lot of uncertainly when it comes to the upcoming school year; an uncertainty that state educators are trying to navigate.

HOUSTON — With the seemingly daily change of plans, announcements, decrees, conference calls and legal opinions, bringing students back to the classroom in Texas has turned into a fight; a fight between the Federal government, state and local administrators in charge of the health departments and education systems. 

Add to that teacher groups, airing their concerns about what they call either unrealistic safety suggestions or unimplementable plans, and parents who want their kids back in school. No one is really certain what tomorrow will look like, much less when and how the kids are supposed to be learning.

Texas teachers from across the state who spoke with KHOU11 say they are either feeling unheard or left out of the discussions and planning at the decision-making levels, telling

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Some members raise concerns about proposed Amendment G, but State School Board takes no action

SALT LAKE CITY — Some members of the Utah State Board of Education raised concerns about proposed Constitutional Amendment G Thursday, but the board took no position on the proposal.



a building next to a fence: The Utah State Board of Education building in Salt Lake City is pictured on Tuesday, March 31, 2020.


© Kristin Murphy, Deseret News
The Utah State Board of Education building in Salt Lake City is pictured on Tuesday, March 31, 2020.

The proposed amendment, which is on the statewide ballot this election cycle, asks voters if they support expanding the use of state income tax to also support children and people with disabilities.

Income tax has been solely earmarked for public education since 1946, and in 1996, Utah voters passed a constitutional amendment that expanded the earmark to include higher education.

Board member Janet Cannon said the ballot language “is problematic because nowhere does it tell people that this will affect education in a big way.”

Amendment G asks: “Shall the Utah Constitution be amended to expand

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Newburgh teacher voices health concerns with hybrid learning set to start in October

A Newburgh school teacher expressed concern about COVID-19 Monday with hybrid learning set to start next month.

Janiana Barham-Middleton is a special-education teacher at Newburgh Free Academy. Barham-Middleton says the student population at the school is largely Latino and African American–two groups with the highest rate of infection in New York and nationwide.

“This has hit their communities so incredibly hard,” says Barham-Middleton. “There are families–whole families–that have been lost as a result of this.”

Barham-Middleton says there are other staff members who are also worried about returning to in-person instruction.

So far, four school districts in Orange County have reported positive COVID-19 cases. Valley Central is the latest district to report a positive case. The county is also reporting a slight uptick in its infection rate.

Barham-Middlton is urging the Newburgh School District to

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Puyallup teacher’s union raises PPE concerns as students return to class

Puyallup teachers will be in class to prepare on Monday in order to welcome special education students on Tuesday.

PUYALLUP, Wash — Some Puyallup teachers will be back in their classrooms Monday as they prepare for the return of special education students.

Those students will head back to the classroom Tuesday, but the union that represents the more than 1,400 teachers in the district said they have some concerns about returning students and staff to classrooms.

“We are very concerned about the (personal protective equipment), and that’s a concern that we had on Friday,” said Puyallup Education Association President Karen McNamara. “There has been some emailing back and forth this weekend.”

Teachers will be in the classroom on Monday without students, but the union wants to make sure all the pieces are in place to keep everyone safe, which includes making sure there is enough personal protective equipment.

“They’re telling

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Puyallup teacher’s union raises PPE concerns as students return class

Puyallup teachers will be in class to prepare on Monday in order to welcome Special Education students on Tuesday.

PUYALLUP, Wash — Some Puyallup teachers will be back in their classrooms Monday preparing for the return of Special Education students. 

Those students will head back to the classroom on Tuesday, but the union that represents the more than 1,400 teachers in the district said that they have some concerns about returning students and staff to classrooms.

“We are very concerned about the PPE, and that’s a concern that we had on Friday. There has been some emailing back and forth this weekend,” Puyallup Education Association President Karen McNamara explained.

On the first day, teachers will be there without students, but the union wants to make sure all the pieces are in place to keep everyone safe, which includes making sure there’s enough PPE.

“They’re telling us the cloth masks are

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Lewiston-Altura staff express concerns about learning model

Superintendent Gwen Carman says the district has to look at more specific numbers than those provided for Winona County at large. But other issues have been raised, such as whether the district communicates enough with area families about positive cases and whether the district is being fully transparent about its process.

Minnesota Department of Education guidelines regarding how schools should operate during the pandemic are based on the number of new infections per 10,000 people over a 14-day period.

School districts can have in-person learning for all students if the county’s infection rate is 0-9. The guidance gets more restrictive as the infection rate increases. If the infection rate is 50 or more, the guidelines suggest all students should be using distance learning.

The first day of school for Lewiston-Altura was Sept. 8. According to the Minnesota Department of Health, Winona County had an infection rate of 77.49 during the

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African American State & Local Government Employees Have Higher Concerns About Health and Financial Risks of COVID-19

African American State & Local Government Employees Have Higher Concerns About Health and Financial Risks of COVID-19

PR Newswire

WASHINGTON, Sept. 24, 2020

Nearly 40 Percent of African American State & Local Workers Expect to Take on More Debt

WASHINGTON, Sept. 24, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — A national poll of state and local employees finds that  African American workers are more concerned than their colleagues about the potential health and economic impacts of COVID-19. Thirty-nine percent of African American state and local employees are worried about contracting the coronavirus at work as compared to 22 percent of all other survey respondents. Twenty-one percent of African American workers are concerned about a reduction in pay, which is nearly twice the level of other state and local employees (11 percent).

(PRNewsfoto/Center for State and Local Gove)
(PRNewsfoto/Center for State and Local Gove)

As the pandemic lingers, 39 percent of African American state and local employees expect to take

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State revenue shortfalls raise education funding concerns

The Florida Education Association took a hard stance in a Friday news conference against the state’s ongoing approach to school reopening, criticizing the Governor’s Office and Department of Education for creating chaos, confusion and instability. The group argued for changes to the state’s education funding strategy and its rules for reporting COVID-19 cases in schools. State officials found the association’s request rather unusual, though. Read on for that story and more education news.



a group of people posing for the camera: Varsity cheerleaders attend a football game on Friday, Sept. 11, 2020, between Wiregrass Ranch High School and St. Petersburg High School at St. Petersburg.


© Douglas R. Clifford/Times/Tampa Bay Times/TNS
Varsity cheerleaders attend a football game on Friday, Sept. 11, 2020, between Wiregrass Ranch High School and St. Petersburg High School at St. Petersburg.

The FEA urged the state to extend the funding waivers set forth in the department’s July reopening order. The union is suing to throw out that very same order.The Florida School Finance Officers Association has joined the call to protect district budgets for the rest of 2020-21,

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