Nissan Foundation launches 2021 grant cycle to build inclusive communities through education

Nissan Foundation

Established in 1992, the mission of the Nissan Foundation is to build community through valuing cultural diversity. The Nissan Foundation is part of Nissan North America's commitment to enrich people's lives by helping to meet the needs of communities throughout the U.S. through philanthropic investments, corporate outreach sponsorships and other charitable contributions.
Established in 1992, the mission of the Nissan Foundation is to build community through valuing cultural diversity. The Nissan Foundation is part of Nissan North America’s commitment to enrich people’s lives by helping to meet the needs of communities throughout the U.S. through philanthropic investments, corporate outreach sponsorships and other charitable contributions.
Established in 1992, the mission of the Nissan Foundation is to build community through valuing cultural diversity. The Nissan Foundation is part of Nissan North America’s commitment to enrich people’s lives by helping to meet the needs of communities throughout the U.S. through philanthropic investments, corporate outreach sponsorships and other charitable contributions.
  • Since 1992, the Nissan Foundation has awarded more than $12 million to more than 150 nonprofit organizations committed to promoting cultural awareness and understanding

  • The Nissan Foundation annually awards grants to nonprofits in California, Georgia, Michigan, Mississippi, New York, Tennessee and Texas

  • Deadline

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Study highlights need for culturally relevant programs to educate Black communities on hepatitis B

Hepatitis B disproportionately impacts U.S. Blacks, including African American and Haitian Blacks. Both communities suffer from widespread misinformation and access to care issues that might avert disease detection and prevention, according to a study published in Cancer Causes & Control by researchers at Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine.

The study’s findings point to a great need for culturally relevant, community-based interventions that involve and educate Black communities so that they better understand their risks for hepatitis B, get screened, and seek healthcare.

Hepatitis B, or HBV, is a leading cause of liver cancer, which is predicted to surpass breast, colorectal, and prostate cancer as the third leading cause of cancer-related death by 2030, according to the study’s lead author Patricia Jones, M.D., assistant professor of medicine at the Miller School.

In research published last

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Challenges faced by rural communities



a person holding a colorful umbrella: As the country takes to online education, the current pandemic is impacting rural students more than those who live in cities.


© Provided by The Financial Express
As the country takes to online education, the current pandemic is impacting rural students more than those who live in cities.

By Divya Jain

The whole world is adjusting to the reality of the Covid-19 pandemic by finding alternatives to the disruptions caused thus far. Corporations are allowing their workforces to work from home, while schools and colleges are moving classes online.

In India, people are relying heavily on strong internet connections, computers, or smartphones to get back to business during the new normal. The crisis has nudged students to pick up e-learning opportunities, as there is no end in sight. As the country takes to online education, the current pandemic is impacting rural students more than those who live in cities.

However, e-learning is transforming the sector even in remote rural areas. Tier-3 and tier-4 towns are upping the ante by investing in

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Fletcher Fund launches to support students from underserved communities in pursuing higher education

Fletcher Fund launches to support students from underserved communities in pursuing higher education

PR Newswire

ATLANTA, Oct. 7, 2020

Funders Christian Fletcher and Amber Fletcher seek to break cycle of inequality through education

ATLANTA, Oct. 7, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — The Fletcher Fund for Equality and Education announced today it will begin accepting applications in the coming months from exceptional students from underserved communities as they pursue opportunities in higher education. The fund will provide scholarships, mentorships, and other critical support to each selected student. The goal is to break down potential barriers preventing them from pursuing higher education at the top colleges and universities their achievements deserve.

The Fletcher Fund seeks to the break cycle of inequality experienced by the underserved through education.

The fund will initially focus on high schools in Mobile, Alabama, the hometown of founders Christian and Amber Fletcher, who both came from working

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New report shows higher education participation for Gypsy, Romany and Traveller Communities declining

Further Education News

The FE News Channel gives you the latest education news and updates on emerging education strategies and the #FutureofEducation and the #FutureofWork.

Providing trustworthy and positive Further Education news and views since 2003, we are a digital news channel with a mixture of written word articles, podcasts and videos. Our specialisation is providing you with a mixture of the latest education news, our stance is always positive, sector building and sharing different perspectives and views from thought leaders, to provide you with a think tank of new ideas and solutions to bring the education sector together and come up with new innovative solutions and ideas.

FE News publish exclusive peer to peer thought leadership articles from our feature writers, as well as user generated content across our network of over 3000 Newsrooms, offering multiple sources of the latest education news across the Education and Employability sectors.

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Massachusetts Department of Education urges 16 school districts in ‘low-risk’ COVID-19 communities to return to in-person learning

The Massachusetts Department of Education is pressuring 16 communities and school districts, which the state deemed “low risk” COVID-19 areas, to return to in-person learning.

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In a letter signed by the Department of Education Commissioner Jeffrey Riley, the agency said its guidelines only recommend remote learning for communities designated as “high risk.” The letter was sent to 16 communities that the state deemed low risk who continue to exclusively offer remote learning.

“In light of the stark discrepancy between local public health data and your reopening plan, I am requesting a timeline by which you anticipate providing in-person instruction for the majority of your students including in-person instruction for vulnerable populations,” Riley said in the letter.

The 16 communities and school districts included:

Amesbury

Belmont

Berkshire Arts and Technology Charter Public (District)

Bourne

Boxford

East Longmeadow

Gardner

Gill-Montague

Hoosac Valley Regional

Manchester Essex Regional

Mohawk Trail

Hawlemont

Pittsfield

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