Megan Thee Stallion launches her own scholarship fund for women of color pursuing higher education

Megan Thee Stallion has launched her own scholarship fund that celebrates women of color who are pursuing a college education or postgraduate degree.

The Savage hitmaker joined forces with Amazon Music to award two $10,000 scholarships as part of her Don’t Stop Scholarship Fund, which is named after her latest single, Don’t Stop, featuring Young Thug.  

And it turns out the rapper and musician has been working toward a health care administration degree at Texas Southern University, all while she’s been topping the charts over the last year-and-a-half.   

Giving back: Megan Thee Stallion, 25, has launched her own scholarship fund for women of color pursuing higher education

‘COLLEGE HOTTIES LISTEN UP BECAUSE THIS ONE IS FOR YOU ‼️‼️‼️ I AM GIVING AWAY TWO 10,000 DOLLAR SCHOLARSHIPS TO WOMEN OF COLOR PURSUING A DEGREE IN ANY FIELD OF STUDY IN ANY PART OF THE WORLD,’ she wrote on Instagram in the

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Study shows few teachers of color represented at public schools on Long Island

WESTBURY, Long Island (WABC) — It is a problem only made worse by the disparities in public education created in this pandemic – according to a recent study at Hofstra University, far too few teachers of color are represented in public schools on Long Island.

In fact, the research at the National Center for Suburban Studies looked at 642 public schools and found as many as 61 percent had no Black teachers at all, and 43 percent had no Latino teachers.

“If this were a story in Mississippi or Alabama, I’d say, ‘Well, it’s the vestiges of Jim Crowe,’ but this is up on Long Island,” said Larry Levy.

Black educators tell Eyewitness News that if school boards do not act now, it will only get worse, with more of the older, minority teachers at higher risk for COVID.

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“So

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Seattle-area families of color are talking about improving remote education. Here are some of their ideas.

Regina Elmi is the executive director of the Somali Parent Education Board. Ann Ishimaru is associate professor of education at the University of Washington. The authors wrote this piece along with 10 other African American, Somali, Latina and Vietnamese parent leaders from the Renton, Federal Way, Kent, Highline and Seattle school districts.

Thousands of families and caregivers in King County are anxious as schools operate online. In recent months, we’ve experienced the devastation of COVID-19 and a summer of reckoning with anti-Black racism sparked by the killings of Ahmaud Arbery, George Floyd, Breonna Taylor and the shooting of Jacob Blake.

We also see racial inequities deepening in our schools. As difficult and heartbreaking as this time has been, many families in BIPOC (Black, Indigenous and people of color) communities have been mobilizing and finding creative ways to support and educate their children.

We challenge educational systems to consider: What might

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