Islamic, Communist, and Other Autocratic Regimes Back China’s Treatment of Muslims in Xinjiang

Chinese President Xi Jinping and Saudi King Salman in Beijing. (Photo by Nicolas Asfouri/AFP via Getty Images)

(CNSNews.com) – Twenty Islamic states at the United Nations on Tuesday joined two dozen others, including communist and autocratic regimes, in a show of support for China’s policies in Xinjiang province, where — according to the United States and others — more than a million Uyghurs and other minority Muslims have been incarcerated in re-education camps.

The countries rallied around Beijing at a meeting in New York of the U.N. General Assembly committee dealing with human rights, after a group of mostly Western nations, including the U.S., issued a joint statement deploring the Chinese Communist Party’s abuses in the country’s far-western province, as well as its clampdown on democracy in Hong Kong.

Reflecting China’s growing clout in the international community and the far-reaching impact of its massive Belt and Road Initiative (BRI) investment

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How China’s new language policy sparked rare backlash in Inner Mongolia

Ethnic Mongolian students and parents in northern China have staged mass school boycotts over a new curriculum that would scale back education in their mother tongue, in a rare and highly visible protest against the ruling Communist Party’s intensified push for ethnic assimilation.



a group of people standing in front of a building: Mongolian citizens protest at the Ministry of Foreign Affairs in Ulaanbaatar, the capital of Mongolia, against China's plan to reduce teaching in Mongolian at schools in the neighboring Chinese region of Inner Mongolia on August 31, 2020.


© Byambasuren Byamba-Ochir/AFP/Getty Images
Mongolian citizens protest at the Ministry of Foreign Affairs in Ulaanbaatar, the capital of Mongolia, against China’s plan to reduce teaching in Mongolian at schools in the neighboring Chinese region of Inner Mongolia on August 31, 2020.

Under the new policy, Mandarin Chinese will replace Mongolian as the medium of instruction for three subjects in elementary and middle schools for minority groups across the Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region, home to 4.2 million ethnic Mongolians.

Authorities have defended the adoption of a national standardized curriculum — which comes with Chinese textbooks compiled and approved by policymakers in Beijing — will improve minority students’ paths

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China’s push to educate people out of poverty starts with free school



a group of people posing for the camera: Students study at the newly built Wenchang Middle School at Yuexi county, Liangshan Yi autonomous prefecture in Sichuan province. Photo: Simon Song


© SCMP
Students study at the newly built Wenchang Middle School at Yuexi county, Liangshan Yi autonomous prefecture in Sichuan province. Photo: Simon Song

Shenzi Nibumu is two years older than her classmates in the southwest Chinese province of Sichuan.

Her family was too poor to send her to school at the age most children start and her elder sister dropped out of school to become a migrant worker in Guangdong province to support the family.

Shenzi Nibumu is now 17 years old and in ninth grade – the third year of middle school. She said she did not want to follow her sister’s path by dropping out to get a job, and instead wanted to continue with her studies and go to university.

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“I wish to go to medical school and

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Opinion | Trump’s plan for ‘pro-American’ education would make China’s Communists proud

Deng declared that the “biggest mistake” the Chinese Communist Party had made was “primarily in ideological and political education.” In subsequent circulars, the Chinese Communist Party described China as under siege by enemies out to indoctrinate China’s youth and snuff out Chinese values, culture and faith. The party launched what it called a Patriotic Education Campaign that over the past three decades has imbued its people with a resentful form of nationalism.

In the 1950s, Mao Zedong had stressed that China was a victor in the war against imperialism. But the Patriotic Education Campaign reinterpreted China’s history to portray China as a victim. The whole nation, the party’s Central Committee and the State Council noted in a document from August 1994, must study China’s humiliating history from the Opium War on to grasp the evil intent of what came to be known as “hostile Western forces.” As the Ambassador James

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Trump’s ‘patriotic education’ campaign aligns with autocrats like China’s Xi Jinping and Hungary’s Viktor Orban

“Patriotic moms and dads are going to demand that their children are no longer fed hateful lies about this country,” Trump said. “American parents are not going to accept indoctrination in our schools, cancel culture at work or the repression of traditional faith, culture and values in the public square. Not anymore.”

There’s nothing particularly new about this latest shot across the bow in the United States’ divisive culture war, apart from the president using his bully pulpit to make it. Trump can’t exactly rewrite textbooks and curriculums, which are the province of the states and local districts. But it’s yet another dynamite charge to stoke a nativist base. Weeks away from an election, Trump said his administration would launch a national panel to create a “pro-American curriculum,” which he dubbed the “1776 Commission.”

That appears to be a White House response to the “1619 Project,” a Pulitzer Prize-winning set

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China’s push to teach in Mandarin sparks Mongol resistance

Parents walked toward a wall of metal barriers, holding the hands of their first-graders as dozens of police and men in dark clothes watched and scowled in the afternoon light. One by one, mothers and fathers let their children go into an elementary school that seemed more ominous than it did the year before.

A grandfather stood behind a tree with tears in his eyes as students filed through metal detectors, red scarves tied around their necks, and climbed the steps toward their classrooms. “All ethnic groups must embrace tightly like the seeds of a pomegranate,” read a slogan from Chinese President Xi Jinping printed in Mandarin on the wall.

“They are talking about great ethnic unity. Is this what unity looks like?” said the Mongol grandfather, who did not give his name. He and his wife, Ochir Bao, a woman in her 60s, had come to this school —

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Disinformation causes ‘twists’ in bilingual education in China’s Inner Mongolia

Students at a class in Hohhot, north China’s Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region, May 7, 2020. Photo: Xinhua

China’s work in implementing bilingual education of Putonghua and an ethnic language in ethnically populated regions in recent years has been smooth and effective in cultivating bilingual talent. Some twists happened in the Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region as a new regulation on bringing courses taught in Putonghua has not been fully explained to parents, and disinformation has misled the public, with the possible interference of overseas separatists. 

Since this year’s fall semester, students in first grade in ethnic primary and middle schools in Inner Mongolia would use the state-approved textbook for Chinese, and the course would be taught in Putonghua. Before the reform, students started learning the course from second grade. Mongolian language remains the medium of instruction in other subjects from first grade. The Inner Mongolia government released an explanation on its

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