Katrina Kaif marks International Day of The Girl Child by advocating ‘Educate Girls’ in Madhya Pradesh village – sex and relationships

Supporting more opportunity for girls, Bollywood diva Katrina Kaif marked International Day of The Girl Child by giving fans a sneak peek of her visit to Madhya Pradesh village to increase awareness on gender inequality faced by the girls worldwide based upon their gender. Sharing her “firsthand experience of bringing girls #BacktoSchool” in Madhya Pradesh’s Miyapura village, Katrina advocated for gender equality through ‘Educate Girls’ project on the Day of Girls on October 11, 2020.

Taking to her Instagram handle, Katrina shared a slew of pictures and a video that detailed about her volunteer experience with Team Balika. Bonding with Ayushi, whose house “was the first door I knocked on when I became a #TeamBalika volunteer for @educategirlsngo before lockdown (sic)”, Katrina talked about working in remote areas to bridge the gender and literacy gap.

From painting murals with Ayushi on the walls of the village houses to interacting with

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Pennsylvania lawmakers divided over proposal to provide families $1,000 per child for education expenses

Education in Pennsylvania remains a hot button topic, and as a state Senate committee heard testimony Monday on a bill that would give families stimulus funding for educational-related expenses, one lawmaker called for a truce.



a small child sitting on a table


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That was state Sen. Andy Dinniman’s hope when the Senate Education Committee’s hearing started. The panel heard from both proponents and opponents of Senate Bill 1230, which would give families $1,000 per child for educational purposes. The money could be used by parents to buy a computer for their kids’ remote learning, pay for tutoring or even cover private school tuition bills.

“Whether you like this bill or you don’t like this bill, what is happening in our schools is a problem,” said Dinniman, the West Chester Democrat and minority chair on the committee. “We have to come together to solve this problem, and we have to stop the

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Child Care Centers Provided Young Students A Safe Place To Learn Online. Michigan Won’t Cover The Cost.

From Chalkbeat Detroit:



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By Koby Levin Sep 22, 2020, 6:31pm EDT

Two weeks into the school year, Monique Snyder had to tell a dozen working parents that they would have to find somewhere else for their children to learn online.

Like many child care providers in the Detroit area, Snyder has opened her centers to young K-12 students whose classrooms remained closed due to the coronavirus pandemic. But Snyder learned this month that the state won’t subsidize care during the school day for children from low-income families.

She told desperate parents that they would have to pay her out of pocket or find another place for their children to learn.

“It was horrible,” said Snyder, whose business is already in danger of closing due to the pandemic. “The biggest question they kept asking me was, ‘What am I supposed to do?’ And I literally did

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Education Department’s child abuse outreach during Covid doesn’t go far enough, experts say | Us World News

(CNN) — The US Department of Education’s muted response to concerns about unreported child abuse in the age of virtual learning is fueling new distress among family welfare experts and advocates.

The Education Department declined to tell CNN on the record what steps have been taken to help teachers or other members of school communities spot signs of child abuse through a webcam during virtual teaching. Instead, a department spokesperson pointed to a series of online resources created by local and state education agencies that they help to make public.

That lack of federal guidance has set off alarm bells for experts.

“Clearly just posting resources on a website is not enough,” said Maureen Kenny Winick, a Florida International University professor whose expertise includes child maltreatment.

“Sometimes accessing what you need takes many clicks and teachers may have more immediate concerns about academics and distance learning right now.”

The concern

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The Rise of Child Labor in the Coronavirus Pandemic

The coronavirus pandemic has forced millions of the world’s poorest children to halt their educations and go to work to help support their families, as schools have closed and parents’ incomes have fallen or vanished.

The children do work that is arduous, dirty and often dangerous: hauling bricks or gravel, scavenging for recyclables, begging or chopping weeds on plantations. Much of their employment is illegal.

It is a catastrophic shift for some of the world’s most vulnerable people, undoing years of gains for education and against child labor, and undermining their prospects of climbing out of poverty. Countless promising students have had their educations cut short, and it remains unclear when schools will reopen. But even when they do, many of the children are unlikely to go back to the classroom.

Here are some key findings of a New York Times report on conditions for these poor children.

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Education Department’s child abuse outreach during Covid doesn’t go far enough, experts say

The US Department of Education’s muted response to concerns about unreported child abuse in the age of virtual learning is fueling new distress among family welfare experts and advocates.



Betsy DeVos wearing glasses and looking at the camera


© Alex Wong/Getty Images


The Education Department declined to tell CNN on the record what steps have been taken to help teachers or other members of school communities spot signs of child abuse through a webcam during virtual teaching. Instead, a department spokesperson pointed to a series of online resources created by local and state education agencies that they help to make public.

That lack of federal guidance has set off alarm bells for experts.

“Clearly just posting resources on a website is not enough,” said Maureen Kenny Winick, a Florida International University professor whose expertise includes child maltreatment.

“Sometimes accessing what you need takes many clicks and teachers may have more immediate concerns about academics and distance learning right

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NEP focuses on quality education, good values for every child: Haryana Min

Chandigarh (Haryana) [India], September 27 (ANI): Haryana Education Minister Kanwar Pal on Saturday said the recently announced New Education Policy (NEP) emphasises that no child of the country should be deprived of education whether the child is homeless or lives in a slum area or living in the city or in the village or metros.
“Fundamental changes have been made in the Policy to ensure that every child receives quality education starting from pre-school to higher education level easily. NEP emphasises that no child of the country should be deprived of education whether the child is homeless or lives in a slum area or living in the city or in the village or metros,” Pal said in a statement.
The Minister said it was for the first time that suggestions for the new NEP were taken from the representatives of the Panchayati Raj, Urban Local Bodies and the representatives of

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Should I send my child to school with a cold?

Back in April, NHS doctors were told to look out for a rare but dangerous reaction in children.

This was prompted by eight children in London becoming ill, including a 14-year-old who died. They were hospitalised with similar symptoms (including a high fever, rash, red eyes, swelling and general pain) that initially looked like sepsis. Some of those patients tested positive for Covid-19, prompting conversations in the medical community about whether there might be a new inflammatory syndrome which could be an extreme reaction to Covid among very young patients.

Some of these cases have been likened to a rare inflammatory heart condition called Kawasaki, for which the symptoms are similar to sepsis and toxic shock. 

“For doctors looking after these children, they present as if they’ve got sepsis,” explained Dr Patel. “They’ve got a fever and abnormal blood tests, but when further investigation is done they recognise that there’s

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State’s lawyer: school districts must prove that $3,636 isn’t enough to educate a child | Courts

CONCORD — After 25 years of failure, the state Supreme Court needs to step in and ensure that schools are properly funded in the state, the lawyer representing five school districts said Thursday.

Manchester lawyer Michael Tierney told reporters that he wouldn’t have brought the latest school funding suit if the governor and the Legislature did their jobs.

But despite the decades-old Claremont I and Claremont II that found a state responsibility to pay for a constitutionally adequate education, the state  only anted up $3,636 per student last year.

“In this case and for the past 25 years, they (the Legislature) have substantially underfunded with the promise of next year, next year, next year,” Tierney told the justices. 

Tierney spoke as the Supreme Court took up its first school funding cases since 2008. Tierney said 11 others have reached the court since the initial Claremont decision.

The Claremont precedents were

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Congressional parents mostly silent on child care struggle amid Covid

When the coronavirus pandemic hit in mid March, schools and day cares across the nation were forced to temporarily close. Next, summer camps were impacted, with nearly two-thirds opting not to open their doors over the summer. And now about 60% of school-aged children are settling into the new academic year virtually. Meanwhile, working parents are struggling to keep pace and juggle all their conflicting responsibilities.  

Nearly six out of 10 American households say they’ve had serious problems caring for their children since the beginning of the coronavirus pandemic. Of those, over a third report experiencing serious challenges keeping up with their children’s educational needs, according to recent polling conducted by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. They surveyed 1,000 U.S. adults with at least one child living in the household in July and August. 

And it doesn’t look like there’s any support

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