Opinion: A chance to rebuild better, if health care, education institutions allow it

John A. Kitzhaber

Kitzhaber was governor of Oregon from 1995 to 2003 and from 2011 to 2015.

From the skybridge at OHSU, in a neighborhood where the median annual income is $42,000 and poverty is less than 15%—you can see neighborhoods six miles away with incomes half the size and the poverty rate twice as big. Between the skybridge and those neighborhoods, poverty and its associated health disparities increase over 2.8% per mile. This “social gradient” exists in cities across our nation and illustrates institutional racism hidden in plain sight.

The Black Lives Movement has powerfully highlighted one important manifestation of social injustice—the issue of police brutality and the need for more transparency and accountability in law enforcement. But the root causes of institutional racism run far deeper; they are embedded in the conditions of injustice that drive the widening disparities in health and income, and in the diminishing economic

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Career Technical Education Pathway Gives Students a Chance to be the Expert-on-Call

LOS ANGELES, Oct. 1, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — When Learn4Life high schools transitioned to distance learning, distributing laptops and hotspots to all students was fairly easy. The challenge was the increase in requests to the Learn4Life information technology (IT) help desk. The staff had been serving about 2,800 employees with tech problems. Now, the IT help desk needed to respond to 23,000 students as well. So, they turned to their own students in the IT career technical education pathway, building a corps of interns to support fellow students and staff with help desk requests – with great success.


A Learn4Life student in the IT career technical education pathway

“The program is working remarkably well and we’re so proud of our students,” said Nick Carlson, IT teacher. “Just imagine the confidence boost when a student can solve problems for a teacher or principal and be zealously thanked for it. Especially for many of our at-risk students who come to us

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Elizabeth Garbe and M. Royce Van Tassell: A chance to see candidates for the Utah Board of Education

Perhaps the most underappreciated elected officials in Utah are members of the state Board of Education. The Utah Constitution assigns them collectively “general control and supervision” of all of public education, which means they administer more than $5.6 billion to the state’s schools each year.

They send the money to every school district and charter school that pays for your children’s teachers. And they verify that schools followed all the state and federal rules governing how to spend those dollars.

And while the Legislature meets for 45 consecutive days each year, then adjourns “sine die,” the Board of Education continues its work year-round. Each month, the members consider rules the Legislature has required them to write. They adopt and revise the standards schools must follow. They evaluate which teachers receive a teaching license and which teaching licenses they need to revoke. In other words, they have an enormous impact on

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