California Primary Care Association and Capital Impact Partners Launch $25 Million COVID Response Loan Fund for Community Health Centers | News

SACRAMENTO, Calif. and ARLINGTON, Va., Oct. 8, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — California’s community health centers (CHCs) are facing significant lost revenue as a result of business disruptions due to the COVID-19 pandemic. At the same time, CHCs are incurring unforeseen costs to implement technology for virtual health consultations. The impacts of the pandemic have been further exacerbated for many CHCs by the wildfires plaguing the state.

To bridge this cash flow gap, the California Primary Care Association (CPCA) and Capital Impact Partners have launched the $25 million CPCA COVID Response Loan Fund to provide flexible financing for CHCs. Fund investors include the Alliance Healthcare Foundation, The California Endowment, The California Wellness Foundation, JPMorgan Chase, Richard W. Goldman Family Foundation, and UnitedHealth Group.

It is a vital need, as CHCs not only serve one-in-six Californians, but also a predominate number of patients who fall below the federal poverty level.  California CHCs

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California Primary Care Association and Capital Impact Partners Launch $25 Million COVID Response Loan Fund for Community Health Centers

SACRAMENTO, Calif. and ARLINGTON, Va., Oct. 8, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — California’s community health centers (CHCs) are facing significant lost revenue as a result of business disruptions due to the COVID-19 pandemic. At the same time, CHCs are incurring unforeseen costs to implement technology for virtual health consultations. The impacts of the pandemic have been further exacerbated for many CHCs by the wildfires plaguing the state.

To bridge this cash flow gap, the California Primary Care Association (CPCA) and Capital Impact Partners have launched the $25 million CPCA COVID Response Loan Fund to provide flexible financing for CHCs. Fund investors include the Alliance Healthcare Foundation, The California Endowment, The California Wellness Foundation, JPMorgan Chase, Richard W. Goldman Family Foundation, and UnitedHealth Group.

It is a vital need, as CHCs not only serve one-in-six Californians, but also a predominate number of patients who fall below the federal poverty level.  California CHCs

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Riverside County supervisors to allocate $1M to adult learning centers

City News Service
Published 2:10 p.m. PT Sept. 28, 2020 | Updated 2:14 p.m. PT Sept. 28, 2020

Riverside County supervisors Tuesday are slated to approve a $1 million allocation of federal Coronavirus Aid, Relief & Economic Security Act funds for the purchase of tablets and other gear needed by adult learning centers that have switched to distance education.

Supervisors Karen Spiegel and Kevin Jeffries are jointly seeking the full Board of Supervisors’ approval for the expenditure, under what’s been dubbed the “Education Device Support Program.”

In a statement posted to the board’s policy agenda, the supervisors said the program will “ensure that all underserved students in Riverside County have the tools necessary to succeed in a distance learning format.”

There are 20 adult — or, “continuation” — schools located throughout the county, serving roughly 15,000 students over the age of 18.

These students fall outside the county Office of

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Child Care Centers Provided Young Students A Safe Place To Learn Online. Michigan Won’t Cover The Cost.

From Chalkbeat Detroit:



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By Koby Levin Sep 22, 2020, 6:31pm EDT

Two weeks into the school year, Monique Snyder had to tell a dozen working parents that they would have to find somewhere else for their children to learn online.

Like many child care providers in the Detroit area, Snyder has opened her centers to young K-12 students whose classrooms remained closed due to the coronavirus pandemic. But Snyder learned this month that the state won’t subsidize care during the school day for children from low-income families.

She told desperate parents that they would have to pay her out of pocket or find another place for their children to learn.

“It was horrible,” said Snyder, whose business is already in danger of closing due to the pandemic. “The biggest question they kept asking me was, ‘What am I supposed to do?’ And I literally did

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HISD fights digital divide with Digital Learning Centers

HISD’s 36 Digital Learning Centers will be open weekdays from 8 a.m. – 3 p.m. and provide eligible students with much-needed resources.

HOUSTON — Virtual learning is tough, but it can feel nearly impossible for parents struggling to provide their children with the needed equipment, such as laptops and internet.

That’s why HISD is opening select campuses this week to support families who do not have access to the technology needed to participate in online learning at home.

The centers are only available to those without access to technology.

The Digital Learning Centers, which are scheduled to open Tuesday, will be available to middle school and elementary students. They will be opened weekdays from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m.

HISD isn’t the first Houston-area school district to implement digital centers to help disadvantaged families. 

Fort Bend ISD is also transforming campuses into resource centers with Fort Bend ISD Learning Centers,

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Tennessee’s community health centers need stable funding

Teresa Dabney, Guest columnist
Published 3:58 p.m. CT Sept. 18, 2020

The centers offer quality health, education, social and community services to all patients regardless of their financial situation.

Story Highlights

  • Teresa Dabney is CEO of Community Health of East Tennessee, serving Campbell and surrounding counties east of the Appalachian Mountains.

The economic downturn from the coronavirus pandemic has left many Americans unable to afford medical insurance, large co-payments or deductibles. Fortunately, federally-funded community health centers provide a safety net for those unable to pay medical costs. The centers offer quality health, education, social and community services to all patients regardless of their financial situation and often exist as the only primary-care option in remote areas. Services they provide, such as sliding-scale payment plans, one-on-one assistance with free prescription drug programs, food banks and clothing closets, help families facing hard times.

Community health centers serve 30

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