Young People Care About Elections, They Just Don’t Always Show Up to Vote. Here’s How Education Can Help.

It’s election season in the U.S., and get-out-the-vote efforts are in full swing. And one question being asked by pundits and politicos is, how can we motivate young voters to show up at the polls?

After all, in the most recent presidential election, less than half of citizens ages 18 to 29 participated, compared to 71 percent of those 65 and older and 67 percent of eligible voters ages 45 to 64..

But a book published earlier this year by two political scientists tweaks that question. Young people are already plenty motivated to vote, the authors say, but they don’t always follow through to cast ballots. So this book asks, what is it that prevents young people from actually voting?

The answer has implications for political campaigns, policymakers and of course for educators. The book, called “Making Young Voters,” offers a surprising insight about what kind of education actually influences

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The College of Health Care Professions Named as San Antonio Express-News 2020 Top Workplace Winner

SAN ANTONIO, Oct. 13, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — The College of Health Care Professions (CHCP), a trailblazer in the delivery of allied health education that offers accredited stackable degree and certificate programs aligned to the region’s fastest-growing healthcare fields, has been named The San Antonio Express-News Top Workplace winner. This is the third year in a row CHCP’s San Antonio and South San Antonio campuses were recognized on the Top Workplace list.

“This award highlights the hard work of the entire San Antonio team whose leadership inspires and motivates students to achieve their career goals,” said Eric Bing, chief executive officer of CHCP. “Our faculty and staff are the bedrock of our work to help aspiring professionals find success in careers throughout their lives.”

CHCP was recently featured on the podcast, A Model to Watch, where Bing discusses student wellbeing during the pandemic, how CHCP has designed its

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Barrett faces senators on health care, legal precedent; Defiant Trump defends record at rally; and more | National News

Today is Tuesday, Oct. 13, 2020. Let’s get caught up.

These headlines are in the news this morning: Supreme Court nominee Amy Coney Barrett is set to face senators’ questions; President Trump is as defiant as ever in his first rally after contracting the coronavirus; and Trump and Joe Biden both seek to tie themselves to popular infectious disease expert Dr. Anthony Fauci.

Read on for these stories, other top headlines, celebrity birthdays and more.

 

Top stories



APTOPIX Supreme Court Barrett

Supreme Court nominee Amy Coney Barrett is sworn in during a confirmation hearing before the Senate Judiciary Committee, Monday, Oct. 12, 2020, on Capitol Hill in Washington.




Barrett to face senators on health care, legal precedent

Supreme Court nominee Amy Coney Barrett will face senators’ questions over her approach to health care, legal precedent and even the presidential election during a second day of confirmation hearings on track to

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To get teachers back in the classroom, we need to know the costs of coronavirus health care

The BDN Opinion section operates independently and does not set newsroom policies or contribute to reporting or editing articles elsewhere in the newspaper or on bangordailynews.com.

Melissa Szymanski is an elementary school teacher in Windsor, Connecticut. She wrote this column for The Hartford Courant.

Teachers are a keystone of the nation’s economic recovery. We need to return to classrooms so that students can learn, and parents can return to work.

Yet across the country students, teachers and families are in limbo, contending with virtual schooling, which isn’t an ideal learning environment.

To get teachers like me safely back in schools as soon as possible, we must reduce the risk of spreading this disease to our colleagues and students. I want to get back in the classroom just as much as the families whose kids I teach. By routinely taking COVID-19 tests, even if asymptomatic, we can reduce the school outbreak

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Illinois receives $4.1 million in grants for rural education, health care



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CHAMPAIGN, Ill. (KFVS) – Illinois is receiving $4.1 million in grants from the USDA for education and health care in rural areas.

“The DLT program gives communities the technological access they need to bring educational and medical professionals together to provide the best care possible in rural Illinois.” Illinois State Director Douglas Wilson said. “These projects enhance the quality of life for rural residents by improving their economic opportunities, community infrastructure, environmental health, and the sustainability of agricultural production. Under the leadership of President Trump, USDA is committed to be a strong partner to rural communities.”

USDA is funding 116 projects through the Distance Learning and Telemedicine (DLT) grant program throughout the United States.

It will help health care and education institutions buy the equipment and software necessary to deploy distance-learning and telemedicine services to rural residents.

In the Heartland, the Shawnee

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California Primary Care Association and Capital Impact Partners Launch $25 Million COVID Response Loan Fund for Community Health Centers | News

SACRAMENTO, Calif. and ARLINGTON, Va., Oct. 8, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — California’s community health centers (CHCs) are facing significant lost revenue as a result of business disruptions due to the COVID-19 pandemic. At the same time, CHCs are incurring unforeseen costs to implement technology for virtual health consultations. The impacts of the pandemic have been further exacerbated for many CHCs by the wildfires plaguing the state.

To bridge this cash flow gap, the California Primary Care Association (CPCA) and Capital Impact Partners have launched the $25 million CPCA COVID Response Loan Fund to provide flexible financing for CHCs. Fund investors include the Alliance Healthcare Foundation, The California Endowment, The California Wellness Foundation, JPMorgan Chase, Richard W. Goldman Family Foundation, and UnitedHealth Group.

It is a vital need, as CHCs not only serve one-in-six Californians, but also a predominate number of patients who fall below the federal poverty level.  California CHCs

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California Primary Care Association and Capital Impact Partners Launch $25 Million COVID Response Loan Fund for Community Health Centers

SACRAMENTO, Calif. and ARLINGTON, Va., Oct. 8, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — California’s community health centers (CHCs) are facing significant lost revenue as a result of business disruptions due to the COVID-19 pandemic. At the same time, CHCs are incurring unforeseen costs to implement technology for virtual health consultations. The impacts of the pandemic have been further exacerbated for many CHCs by the wildfires plaguing the state.

To bridge this cash flow gap, the California Primary Care Association (CPCA) and Capital Impact Partners have launched the $25 million CPCA COVID Response Loan Fund to provide flexible financing for CHCs. Fund investors include the Alliance Healthcare Foundation, The California Endowment, The California Wellness Foundation, JPMorgan Chase, Richard W. Goldman Family Foundation, and UnitedHealth Group.

It is a vital need, as CHCs not only serve one-in-six Californians, but also a predominate number of patients who fall below the federal poverty level.  California CHCs

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Opinion: A chance to rebuild better, if health care, education institutions allow it

John A. Kitzhaber

Kitzhaber was governor of Oregon from 1995 to 2003 and from 2011 to 2015.

From the skybridge at OHSU, in a neighborhood where the median annual income is $42,000 and poverty is less than 15%—you can see neighborhoods six miles away with incomes half the size and the poverty rate twice as big. Between the skybridge and those neighborhoods, poverty and its associated health disparities increase over 2.8% per mile. This “social gradient” exists in cities across our nation and illustrates institutional racism hidden in plain sight.

The Black Lives Movement has powerfully highlighted one important manifestation of social injustice—the issue of police brutality and the need for more transparency and accountability in law enforcement. But the root causes of institutional racism run far deeper; they are embedded in the conditions of injustice that drive the widening disparities in health and income, and in the diminishing economic

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U.S. Senator Tina Smith, Lt. Gov. Peggy Flanagan Emphasize U.S. Supreme Court’s Impact on Reproductive Health Care in Minnesota

The new Supreme Court will consider key cases that could take away Minnesotans’ health care coverage and threatens the right to abortion.

St. Paul, MN—  The recent vacancy on the U.S. Supreme Court puts Minnesotans’ health care and reproductive rights in jeopardy. Today Senator Tina Smith, Lieutenant Governor Peggy Flanagan, and leaders from Planned Parenthood and the ACLU had a discussion about the risks to Minnesotans if the Affordable Care Act or Roe v. Wade are overturned by the Supreme Court.

“Judge Barrett’s record of opposing the Affordable Care Act and Roe v. Wade demonstrates that she is not qualified to safeguard our constitutional rights and liberties as a member of our nation’s highest court,” said Senator Tina Smith. “Minnesotans are now facing a very real possibility of losing health care and reproductive rights. At a time when our country is grappling with entrenched health disparities and a pandemic, we

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Senate Democrats Call On Congress To Fix Racial Disparities In Health Care

Thursday, October 1, 2020

Photo caption:

The disproportionate harm people of color have suffered during the COVID-19 pandemic serves as an “appalling reminder of the deep inequities” of the American health care system and demands Congressional remedies, according to a new Senate committee report.

The report cites research showing that Black people are dying from COVID-19 at 3.4 times the rate of white people, when adjusted for age. It notes that COVID-19 accounts for 1 in 5 deaths among Latinos. And American Indian or Alaska Native patients are hospitalized at more than four times the rate of white people, according to the analysis undertaken by Democrats on the Senate Committee on Health, Education, Labor and Pensions (HELP).

The report identifies steps Congress can take to address the lopsided harm, including focusing relief spending and pandemic-related public health initiatives on Black, Latino and Native Americans.

“The pandemic has just

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