Nigeria: 2021 Budget – Buhari Upbeat On Economic Recovery, Raises Health, Education Allocations

President Muhammadu Buhari yesterday presented the 2021 budget proposal to a joint session of the National Assembly, where he expressed hope that even though the country may be heading for another recession, there will be windows for rapid recovery.

Buhari, who addressed the joint session of federal lawmakers at about 11.23am, unveiled a budget of N13.08trillion for the 2021 fiscal year with a projected deficit of N5.20trillion. Critical sectors such as health, education and the National Assembly (NASS) got higher allocations than in previous budgets.

In the same manner, Works and Housing received higher capital votes.

The president who was accompanied by some members of the Federal Executive Council (FEC) to the event, said that while the country was heading for a second recession in four years, the government has put in place plans to ensure rapid recovery in 2021.

He said that the government was working round the clock

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The government has delivered a budget that set its sights low, but still asks too much of Australians | The Canberra Times

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A trillion dollars is a lot of money – a one with 12 zeros after it. That’s where Australia’s debt will peak. To put it in perspective, when the Liberals launched their “debt truck” scare campaign in 2009, they did so with the figure “$315 billion” emblazoned on the side – one-third of the level of projected peak debt under the Coalition today. So what does Australia get from that spending? The economy came into this crisis from a position of weakness. Last year, productivity went backwards, investment was in the doldrums, wage growth was among the slowest on record. We had problems in retail and a downturn in construction. That means we need to have big aspirations. When Curtin and Chifley sat down at the end of World War II to rebuild the economy, they didn’t take a “back to

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Health and education spending is at record levels. This budget should have gone further on tax cuts | The Canberra Times

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The biggest story of the 2020 budget is not, surprisingly, the 12-figure record deficit. It is not the looming trillion dollars in debt. And it is certainly not any supposed unfairness. It’s the loss of a once-in-a-decade chance to shift the economic trajectory of the budget. In normal times, the budget imposes practical limits on government spending. Government can never do everything it wants, because to do so would result in massive deficits, and the public still looks askance at unfunded spending, despite persistent efforts by progressives to undermine this sensible instinct. But in a crisis, different rules apply. Deficits seemingly no longer matter, and governments are free to pursue a broader agenda, for better or worse; as Kevin Rudd did when he found himself unshackled as a result of the Global Financial Crisis. Yet the

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Amherst budget chief says Boston business groups’ state education funding report guillotines local school district

AMHERST – A proposal by two Boston-based business advocacy groups to alter how the state’s Chapter 70 local aid to school districts is disbursed would take a meat cleaver to the local school district, according to the town’s budget chief Sean Mangano.

Nearly $8 million of state education aid would be lopped off the revenue sheets for Amherst school system and Amherst-Pelham regional district, he said.

The two business groups co-wrote a 23-page report – saying more Chapter 70 school aid should go to the least wealthy cities and towns, and less to more affluent communities.

Greater Boston Chamber of Commerce and Massachusetts Business Alliance for Education jointly wrote the research paper – Ryan Flynn from the Alliance and James Sutherland of the Chamber.

The authors acknowledged assistance from a small group of experts.

Those include two men recently in senior leadership positions at the state Department of Elementary and

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Michigan education leaders find relief in 2021 budget

Michigan education leaders were bracing for tough financial decisions next year as the COVID-19 pandemic persists.



a close up of a sign: MLive file photo of Maple Street Magnet School for the Arts in Kalamazoo, Michigan on Tuesday, October 29, 2019.


© Emil Lippe | MLive.com/Emil Lippe | MLive.com/mlive.com/TNS
MLive file photo of Maple Street Magnet School for the Arts in Kalamazoo, Michigan on Tuesday, October 29, 2019.

But school boards and educators are now breathing a sigh of relief, with Gov. Gretchen Whitmer preparing to sign the 2021 budget approved by the legislature last week.

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Michigan’s education spending for K-12 schools, community colleges and universities clocks in at about $17.65 billion, with the School Aid Fund budget coming in at roughly $15.5 billion. The School Aid Fund budget increased by about $300 million compared to the 2019-20 budget.

Read more: 7 things you should know about Michigan’s new budget

“Based on what we were hearing months ago, how can we not be anything but pleased?” said Don Wotruba, executive director for the

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State board of education requests $3.18 billion budget

At last month’s board meeting, Tulsa Public Schools forecast a potential funding crisis next year if school districts don’t receive more support. Tulsa Chief Innovation Officer Andrea Castaneda said it’s unsustainable to cover costs for both brick-and-mortar schools and a virtual academy.

Oklahoma City Public Schools gave a similar outlook. Superintendent Sean McDaniel said the district’s $17 million allocation from the Coronavirus Aid, Relief and Economic Security Act (CARES Act) didn’t cover all COVID-related expenses.

“We’re going to be in dire straits if we don’t continue to get funding,” McDaniel said at an August press conference. “In no way does the CARES (Act) money or any other stimulus money that’s come to us balance us.”

The $2.2 trillion stimulus bill allocated $160 million to Oklahoma schools and nearly $40 million to Gov. Kevin Stitt to support education.

It remains unclear whether the U.S. Congress will pass a second iteration of

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Whitmer: 2021 Michigan Budget Focuses On Education, Health

MICHIGAN — The 2021 Michigan budget focuses on improving education, health programs and other key issues, such as expanding broadband internet services during a time of virtual learning across the state.

The budget — Whitmer’s second — will deliver on many of Whitmer’s signature priorities, including the Michigan Reconnect program for a tuition-free pathway for adults, funding for the Healthy Moms, Healthy Babies program to ensure women have the care they need for a healthy pregnancy, and expanding access to childcare for families, Whitmer’s office said in a news release.

“When we started the budget process in early February, nobody had an idea of how challenging the coming months would be, no knowledge of the devastating impacts that COVID-19 would have, including the impact to our state budget,” Whitmer said. “But Michigan is strong, and by working collaboratively with our partners in the Legislature we now have a budget I

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State superintendent says DPI budget proposal will include increases in mental health, special education funding | Local Education



Stanford Taylor State of Education (copy) (copy)

State Superintendent Carolyn Stanford Taylor giving the 2019 State of Education address at the Capitol building.


Scott Girard



As a difficult state budget season approaches, Wisconsin’s top education official announced she would propose adding money for school special education and mental health services for 2021-23.

State Superintendent Carolyn Stanford Taylor delivered her second annual State of Education address Thursday, speaking virtually via Wisconsin Eye.

“We are clear-eyed about the realities economic challenges will play in state budget decisions,” Stanford Taylor said. “However, it is my hope our leaders can and will continue to prioritize public education and the needs of our most vulnerable learners.”

Throughout her speech, Stanford Taylor praised educators for their work through the unexpected move to virtual learning in the spring and support of students through the summer. She also highlighted equity, a key theme of her 2019 speech, encouraging all educators to become an “agent of

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