Referendum 90: Voters to decide on Washington state sexual health education bill | Alexa News

TRI-CITIES, WA – As the election heads our way one bill about comprehensive sexual health education is gaining a lot of attention and making history.

Referendum 90 marks the the first time citizens will vote on sex education mandates. Up until now, the school board made those decisions.

Now let’s break down Referendum 90: According to votewa.gov right now the law says public school districts can choose to provide sexual health education to students and parents have the ability to excuse their child if they choose.

The upcoming vote on the sexual health education bill, referendum 90, would change things by requiring all public schools in Washington state to provide age-appropriate sexual health education. However, parents would still have the choice to excuse their children from those classes.

Here’s the type of sexual health education students will get if the bill passes:

First, the instruction would cover human development and

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Humanities degrees set to double in price as Senate passes higher education bill

The Senate has passed contentious laws that will dramatically increase the cost of some university degrees, while cutting the cost of others.

Under the changes, the cost of a social sciences degree will more than double, while nursing, mathematics and teaching degrees will become cheaper.

The laws also remove government support for students who fail too many courses.

The cost of degrees will change due to a major shake-up of how much the Commonwealth will pay for students’ degrees.

Education Minister Dan Tehan says the changes will give students cost incentives to study subjects that will prepare them for fields where jobs are needed.

“The … legislation will provide more university places for Australian students, make it cheaper to study in areas of expected job growth and provide more funding and support to regional students and universities,” he said earlier in the week.

The changes were passed by the Government

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Pa. Senate panel vets bill creating education savings accounts to help students get their schooling ‘back on track’

A proposed grant program that would provide 500,000 Pennsylvania K-12 students with $1,000 to spend on education expenses was vetted by the Pennsylvania Senate Education Committee on Monday.

The program is viewed by supporters as a lifeline for students at risk of falling behind in their schooling due to schools’ COVID-19-related switch to remote learning.

But others see it as a foot in the door that will lead to a full-fledged school voucher program. They argue there are better uses for that $500 million that it proposes to spend. Among their suggestions, using it to help school districts with their unanticipated pandemic-related costs and an estimated $1 billion in lost revenue due to the pandemic. Or they recommend putting the money toward extending internet service to rural and underserved communities or to provide resources to serve students and staff’s physical and mental health needs arising from stresses caused by the

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Debate emerges over $500M education bill; some fear it may lead to full-fledged school vouchers in Pa.

With about $1 billion of unspent federal CARES Act funding sitting on the table, Pennsylvania policymakers have offered up a variety of ways to spend it from small business assistance to mortgage and rental assistance.



a room filled with furniture and a table: The Senate Education Committee on Monday will hold a hearing on a bill that would create education savings accounts that provide families with $1,000 per school-age child to pay for resources, including private school tuition, to help them recover educational losses for when schools were closed last spring due to the pandemic. The proposal is controversial because critics see it as leading the way for a full-fledged school voucher program.nAug


© 6, 2020.nFile/Mark Pynes | mpynes@pennlive.com/pennlive.com/TNS
The Senate Education Committee on Monday will hold a hearing on a bill that would create education savings accounts that provide families with $1,000 per school-age child to pay for resources, including private school tuition, to help them recover educational losses for when schools were closed last spring due to the pandemic. The proposal is controversial because critics see it as leading the way for a full-fledged school voucher program.nAug

But none of the proposals are more controversial than one being floated that has some believing it could be the lead-up to a full-fledged school voucher program.

The Senate Education Committee on Monday is holding an 11 a.m.

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Controversial bill mandating sex education in Washington schools goes to voters in November

Referendum 90 would mandate “age-appropriate” sexual health education to be taught to students in every grade in Washington’s public schools.

SEATTLE — Ballots will soon arrive in mailboxes around Washington state and one controversial issue voters will decide on is Referendum 90, which involves the future of sex education in schools. 

In June, it was a coalition of parents who took back control over the future of sex education in schools, gathering enough signatures to put the decision in the voter’s hands. 

“It was a state record during a global pandemic,” Whitney Holz with Informed Parents of Washington explained.

Initially, the legislature passed guidelines that Gov. Jay Inslee signed in March, mandating every public school in the state to provide “age-appropriate” comprehensive sexual health education for every grade by the 2022-23 school year.

Supporters say in the younger grades it can help kids understand how to build healthy relationships and

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Voters to decide on statewide sexual health education bill | News

Voters throughout the state will decide in November whether to let stand or repeal a comprehensive sexual health education bill passed by the state Legislature earlier this year.

Referendum 90 asks voters whether Senate Bill 5395 — which was passed by the state Legislature in March — should be enacted.

The legislation, which is suspended pending the outcome of the election, would require school districts to begin offering “comprehensive sexual health education” to students of all ages.

For all grade levels, parents and guardians would be able opt their students out of the lessons, the law states.

What “comprehensive sexual health education” means varies by grade, according to the state Office of the Superintendent of Public Instruction.

For example, in grades K-3, curriculum could focus on what is called social emotional learning, where students learn about concepts such as self-esteem and decision-making.

“(Social emotional learning) provides skills to do things

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Newsom vetoed high school ethnic studies bill after complaints from Jewish groups about curriculum

SACRAMENTO — Jewish groups angered by their exclusion from a proposed ethnic studies curriculum for California high school students credited their concerns in large part for Gov. Gavin Newsom’s veto of a bill requiring the course for graduation.

It was the latest twist in a fight that has lasted more than a year over whether California’s high school students should be required to take an ethnic studies class and, if so, what should be included. The bill’s author pulled it in 2019 after a similar dispute over the course material. This year a revised version of the bill easily passed the Legislature, but Wednesday night, Newsom vetoed it.

In his veto message, the governor said only that the curriculum still needed more work because it was “insufficiently balanced and inclusive.”

AB331 would have added a one-semester ethnic studies course to the high school graduation requirement, starting with the 2029-30 academic

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Voters to decide on statewide sexual health education bill | Local News

Voters throughout the state will decide in November whether to let stand or repeal a comprehensive sexual health education bill passed by the state Legislature earlier this year.

Referendum 90 asks voters whether Senate Bill 5395 — which was passed by the state Legislature in March — should be enacted.

The legislation, which is suspended pending the outcome of the election, would require school districts to begin offering “comprehensive sexual health education” to students of all ages.

For all grade levels, parents and guardians would be able to opt their students out of the lessons, the law states.

What “comprehensive sexual health education” means varies by grade, according to the state Office of the Superintendent of Public Instruction.

For example, in grades K-3, curriculum could focus on what is called social emotional learning, where students learn about concepts such as self-esteem and decision-making.

“(Social emotional learning) provides skills to do

Read More

House, govt drop education provisions from job creation bill – Politics

The House of Representatives and the government agreed to drop provisions on education from the omnibus bill on job creation on Thursday.

“The government, represented by the Office of the Coordinating Economic Minister and the Education and Culture Ministry, suggests the working committee revoke provisions regarding four laws stipulated in the job creation bill,” an expert staff member at the Office of the Coordinating Economic Minister, Elen Setiadi, said on Thursday as quoted by kompas.com.

The provisions in question are some articles in Law No. 20/2003 on the national education system, Law No. 14/2005 on teachers and lecturers, Law No. 12/2012 on higher education and Law No. 20/2013 on medical education.

House Legislation Body (Baleg) chairman Supratman Andi Agtas, who chaired Thursday’s meeting, said he was glad that the government listened to aspirations from lawmakers and the public.

Read also: NU, Muhammadiyah join coalition opposing educational provisions in omnibus

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