Bad Betting Advice: Big Ten Preview Edition

Over the summer and in the lead up to the delayed but now-likely-to-happen season, I have provided a variety of mathematical analyses and previews of the 2020 college football landscape and Big Ten schedule. Briefly, over the years I have developed my own college football power rankings and tools to translate those rankings into predictions and probabilities related to how the season might progress.

Most recently, I presented my odds for each Big Ten team to win both their respective division and the conference as a whole. I also presented the number of expected wins for each team based on a series of probabilistic Monte Carlo simulations which take in account the historical uncertainty of the preseason rankings.

Now that we are less than two weeks away from the actual kickoff of a Big Ten game, several sources have started to release division and conference odds, as well as the

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Guest column: Online education bad fit for universities and colleges

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It is also very much about how to communicate socially and professionally. With individualized learning that classroom and social tolerance interaction is limited.

There are also serious concerns about student fees. Several universities have increased fees which include fees for non-accessible services and activities.

University revenues have diminished as foreign students are abandoning North American schools. Indeed, it has been estimated that some universities in the U.S. may close as foreign student revenue streams dry up.

In the short run that should not happen in Ontario, although if the provincial government is forced to provide COVID-related financial assistance to universities and colleges it becomes a moot point whether universities should be allowed to continue depending heavily upon provincial funding or be required to dramatically slash costs.

Universities and colleges are faced with immense costs for faculty, administrative staff and facilities.

They may need to seriously begin trimming

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Thailand’s ‘Bad Students’ Demand Education Reform | World News

By Jiraporn Kuhakan and Chayut Setboonsarng

BANGKOK (Reuters) – Thailand’s “Bad Student” campaigners toured Bangkok high schools in a truck on Friday in a protest cheered on by pupils to demand education reform and an end to the harassment of students and of school rules they say are outdated.

The school demonstrations are part of an anti-government protest movement that has been growing since July and is also demanding greater democracy. Some campaigners seek reforms to the powerful monarchy too.

“Stop the harassment of students, cancel outdated rules, and give us comprehensive education reform,” said Laponpat Wangpaisit, an activist from the group that calls itself “Bad Student” outside one Bangkok school.

From behind school gates, pupils cheered the protesters, sang songs mocking school rules and gave the three-finger salute of pro-democracy campaigners. At one school, pupils put a sign on the gate saying: “Teachers at this school harass students.”

The

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Thailand’s ‘Bad Students’ demand education reform

By Jiraporn Kuhakan and Chayut Setboonsarng

BANGKOK (Reuters) – Thailand’s “Bad Student” campaigners toured Bangkok high schools in a truck on Friday in a protest cheered on by pupils to demand education reform and an end to the harassment of students and of school rules they say are outdated.

The school demonstrations are part of an anti-government protest movement that has been growing since July and is also demanding greater democracy. Some campaigners seek reforms to the powerful monarchy too.

“Stop the harassment of students, cancel outdated rules, and give us comprehensive education reform,” said Laponpat Wangpaisit, an activist from the group that calls itself “Bad Student” outside one Bangkok school.

From behind school gates, pupils cheered the protesters, sang songs mocking school rules and gave the three-finger salute of pro-democracy campaigners. At one school, pupils put a sign on the gate saying: “Teachers at this school harass students.”

The

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Research concludes that remote learning might not be a bad thing

Research concludes that remote learning might not be a bad thing
The report concluded remote and online teacher education can achieve the principles of effective learning design in teacher education. Credit: Mohamed Hasan

Remote and blended approaches to teacher education can be as effective as face-to-face approaches concludes a new study from the University of Birmingham.


The new report by Dr. Thomas Perry from the University of Birmingham’s School of Education highlights how in March 2020 many teacher educators were forced to expand their remote learning provision and, in some cases, get to grips with remote teacher education for the first time.

The research examined the evidence and debate within the research literature about whether remote and blended teacher education can be effective and how. It suggests that the tools and technologies of blended and online learning can be used to bring together teaching practice, pupil learning, and new approaches for assessment, discussion and reflection. These may enhance and become a

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Making sense of cholesterol: The good, the bad and the dietary.

Cholesterol can be confusing. But understanding it could help you live a longer, healthier life.

So in honor of Cholesterol Education Month, we asked a pair of experts to clear up five common questions.

Do my blood cholesterol numbers matter?

“The answer is yes,” said Dr. Neil Stone, Bonow Professor in Medicine-Cardiology at Northwestern University’s Feinberg School of Medicine in Chicago.

Studies show healthy people with LDL levels of 100 mg/dL or below tend to have lower rates of heart disease and stroke, supporting a “lower is better” philosophy, according to cholesterol guidelines issued by the American College of Cardiology and American Heart Association in 2018.

Older recommendations emphasized targeting specific cholesterol numbers. But today, doctors use cholesterol tests as part of a personalized assessment of overall cardiovascular risk. Those with the highest risk have the most to gain from cholesterol-lowering, said Stone, who was vice chair of the task

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‘There is no bad weather’: How the Norwegian idea of ‘friluftsliv’ could help Canadians this winter

TORONTO —
With winter on the way and the pandemic keeping people apart, some Canadians may be planning to hibernate indoors this year, but according to the Norwegians, that’s the opposite of what they should do.

Instead, they’re being encouraged to bundle up, head outside, and embrace the cherished Scandinavian concept of friluftsliv.

Hahn Vincent, an outdoor educator and guide with the Association of Canadian Mountain Guides, described friluftsliv as a “way of life,” in which adherents embed themselves in nature.

“It’s a cultural philosophy for Scandinavians,” she said during a telephone interview with CTVNews.ca from Vancouver on Thursday. “This idea of literally being part of nature and that’s done experientially.”

Vincent studied friluftsliv when she was completing her master’s degree in outdoor education in Norway and continues to follow it back home in Canada. She said it’s not about getting the perfect sunset photo or conquering a mountain, but

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The good, the bad and the dietary: Making sense of cholesterol – Lifestyle – Rockford Register Star

Cholesterol can be confusing. But understanding it could help you live a longer, healthier life.

So in honor of Cholesterol Education Month, we asked a pair of experts to clear up five common questions.

Do my blood cholesterol numbers matter?

“The answer is yes,” said Dr. Neil J. Stone, Bonow Professor in Medicine-Cardiology at Northwestern University’s Feinberg School of Medicine in Chicago.

Studies show healthy people with LDL levels of 100 mg/dL or below tend to have lower rates of heart disease and stroke, supporting a “lower is better” philosophy, according to cholesterol guidelines issued by the American College of Cardiology and American Heart Association in 2018.

Older recommendations emphasized targeting specific cholesterol numbers. But today, doctors use cholesterol tests as part of a personalized assessment of overall cardiovascular risk. Those with the highest risk have the most to gain from cholesterol-lowering, said Stone, who was vice chair of the

Read More

The good, the bad and the dietary: Making sense of cholesterol – Lifestyle – Gaston Gazette

Cholesterol can be confusing. But understanding it could help you live a longer, healthier life.

So in honor of Cholesterol Education Month, we asked a pair of experts to clear up five common questions.

Do my blood cholesterol numbers matter?
“The answer is yes,” said Dr. Neil J. Stone, Bonow Professor in Medicine-Cardiology at Northwestern University’s Feinberg School of Medicine in Chicago.

Studies show healthy people with LDL levels of 100 mg/dL or below tend to have lower rates of heart disease and stroke, supporting a “lower is better” philosophy, according to cholesterol guidelines issued by the American College of Cardiology and American Heart Association in 2018.

Older recommendations emphasized targeting specific cholesterol numbers. But today, doctors use cholesterol tests as part of a personalized assessment of overall cardiovascular risk. Those with the highest risk have the most to gain from cholesterol-lowering, said Stone, who was vice chair of the

Read More

The good, the bad and the dietary: Making sense of cholesterol – Lifestyle – Austin American-Statesman

Cholesterol can be confusing. But understanding it could help you live a longer, healthier life.

So in honor of Cholesterol Education Month, we asked a pair of experts to clear up five common questions.

Do my blood cholesterol numbers matter?
“The answer is yes,” said Dr. Neil J. Stone, Bonow Professor in Medicine-Cardiology at Northwestern University’s Feinberg School of Medicine in Chicago.

Studies show healthy people with LDL levels of 100 mg/dL or below tend to have lower rates of heart disease and stroke, supporting a “lower is better” philosophy, according to cholesterol guidelines issued by the American College of Cardiology and American Heart Association in 2018.

Older recommendations emphasized targeting specific cholesterol numbers. But today, doctors use cholesterol tests as part of a personalized assessment of overall cardiovascular risk. Those with the highest risk have the most to gain from cholesterol-lowering, said Stone, who was vice chair of the

Read More