The government has delivered a budget that set its sights low, but still asks too much of Australians | The Canberra Times

news, federal-politics, andrew leigh, federal budget, budget, budget 2020

A trillion dollars is a lot of money – a one with 12 zeros after it. That’s where Australia’s debt will peak. To put it in perspective, when the Liberals launched their “debt truck” scare campaign in 2009, they did so with the figure “$315 billion” emblazoned on the side – one-third of the level of projected peak debt under the Coalition today. So what does Australia get from that spending? The economy came into this crisis from a position of weakness. Last year, productivity went backwards, investment was in the doldrums, wage growth was among the slowest on record. We had problems in retail and a downturn in construction. That means we need to have big aspirations. When Curtin and Chifley sat down at the end of World War II to rebuild the economy, they didn’t take a “back to

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Do Australians care about unis? They’re now part of our social wage, so we should

In 1988, then federal education minister, John Dawkins, drew upon the politics of class privilege to justify rolling out HECS student loans. A university user-pays system was needed, he argued, because Labor was not in the business of funding “middle-class welfare”. At the time, one reason a neoliberal appeal by Labor to its base could deflate widespread public opposition was that just 7% of working-age Australians held a degree.

Three decades on, Education Minister Dan Tehan is also dog-whistling up the politics of class to cut off the loans system to first-year students who fail half their subjects, ramp up fees for many others, deny JobKeeper to workers in the sector and cut funding.




Read more:
The government would save $1 billion a year with proposed university reforms — but that’s not what it’s telling us


Portrait of John Dawkins
Today 33% of working-age Australians have a degree, a big jump from 7% in
Read More

Do Australians care about unis? They’re now part of our social wage, so they should

In 1988, then federal education minister, John Dawkins, drew upon the politics of class privilege to justify rolling out HECS student loans. A university user-pays system was needed, he argued, because Labor was not in the business of funding “middle-class welfare”. At the time, one reason a neoliberal appeal by Labor to its base could deflate widespread public opposition was that just 7% of working-age Australians held a degree.

Three decades on, Education Minister Dan Tehan is also dog-whistling up the politics of class to cut off the loans system to first-year students who fail half their subjects, ramp up fees for many others, deny JobKeeper to workers in the sector and cut funding.




Read more:
The government would save $1 billion a year with proposed university reforms — but that’s not what it’s telling us


Portrait of John Dawkins
Today 33% of working-age Australians have a degree, a big jump from 7% in
Read More

Former Taliban hostage Tim Weeks urges Australians to educate themselves about conflict at Rotary’s World Peace Day Ceremony | The Canberra Times

news, local-news, tim weeks, david savage, afghanistan, taliban, peace, conflict

Former Taliban hostage Tim Weeks has used the keynote speech at Rotary’s World Peace Day Ceremony to call on Australians to be compassionate and think critically about international conflict. Mr Weeks was held captive by the Taliban in Afghanistan for three years before returning to Australia as part of a prisoner swap in 2019. “Peace seemed like an unrealistic goal for me to achieve for my own self, let alone to begin to talk on the matter of world peace,” he said. “For me peace is not the image of a dove or a rainbow, as lovely as they are … peace is a sustainable peace with justice and equality for all.” He said despite suffering at the hands of his Taliban captors, he grew to love the Afghan people. Mr Weeks called upon Australians to educate themselves further about

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