Proposition 208 hurts education-funding cause in Arizona, not help it. Vote no on Invest in Ed

Starved for years, Arizona schools remain undernourished.

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The state has among the largest class sizes in the country, a nation-worst student-counselor ratio of more than 900 to 1, and districts short of nurses, librarians, aides and other support staff.

The crisis is most evident in the continued shortage of certified teachers in classrooms. A survey of schools document more than 1,700 positions that remain unfilled this year alone.

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Proposition 208 promises to change much of that, by imposing a 78% tax increase on individual income above $250,000 (and household income above $500,000). It raises the top marginal tax rate from 4.5% to 8%.

An architect of the plan says passage of the ballot measure would mean reduced class sizes, diminished teacher shortage and markedly improved student achievement.

We wish it were so.

Proposition

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Proposition 208 hurts education-funding cause in Arizona; no on Invest in Ed

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Opinion: Proposition 208 is an extreme proposal with more pitfalls than promise, that deepens the divisions in our society and puts the state’s economy at risk.

Education funding has, rightfully, dominated Arizona’s political and fiscal attention in recent years. But Proposition 208, the Invest in Education Act, goes way too far. (Photo: The Republic)

Starved for years, Arizona schools remain undernourished.

The state has among the largest class sizes in the country, a nation-worst student-counselor ratio of more than 900 to 1, and districts short of nurses, librarians, aides and other support staff.

The crisis is most evident in the continued shortage of certified teachers in classrooms. A survey of schools document more than 1,700 positions that remain unfilled this year alone.

Proposition 208 promises to change much of that, by imposing a 78% tax increase on individual income above $250,000 (and household income above $500,000). It raises the

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Support for Arizona education tax increase ballot measure sees drop in polling

Support for a ballot measure that would raise taxes on higher-earning Arizona residents and small businesses to better-fund public schools saw a drop in support in just a matter of days but the key might be how the question is being asked.



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A Suffolk University/USA Today poll asked 500 likely voters from Sept. 26 to Sept. 30 about their support for Proposition 208, which respondents were told “would create a new 3.5% tax surcharge on individuals with income over $250,000 or married couples with income over $500,000 to increase funding for public education.”

Support for the ballot initiative outpaced opposition 47% to 37%, with 15% undecided.

This marks a significant decrease in support for the initiative compared to a Monmouth University Polling Institute survey collected from Sept. 11 to Sept. 15, which showed 66% supported the measure. Opposition polled at 25%.

They told

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Arizona tribe members settle education claims in lawsuit

FLAGSTAFF, Ariz. (AP) — Members of a small Arizona tribe have reached an agreement with the federal government to partly resolve a lawsuit that sought widespread reform in the agency responsible for educating Native Americans.

Attorneys for Havasupai parents and students say the agreement reached in late September will help thousands of Native Americans who attend U.S. Bureau of Indian Education schools across the country.

A federal court had already determined that the bureau violated its duty to ensure access to special education, therapists and mental health services, including for trauma and childhood adversity. The agreement means a trial that was set to begin in November to consider the remedy for the violations won’t happen.

“They weren’t providing services for my kids, and they kind of dismissed them,” the mother of three students who are identified in the lawsuit by only their first names told The Associated Press. “I thought

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6 Tucson-area students named to advisory panels to improve K-12 education in Arizona | Local news






6 Tucson-area students named to advisory panels on education

State schools chief Kathy Hoffman selected six Tucson-area students to be members of the 2020-2021 Student Advisory Council and others intended to help improve Arizona’s K-12 education.

Tucson eighth-graders Isabella Alvarez and Jade Leon, ninth-grader Jenine Annett and 12th-grader Elena Durazo were appointed to the student advisory council.

Marana 11th-grader Carlisa Parra was appointed to the Equitable and Inclusive Practices Advisory Council, which includes students, teachers, education stakeholders, business leaders and community members.

Tucson ninth-grader Lexana Echegaray was appointed to the Indian Education Advisory Council, also comprised of students, teachers and the various education stakeholders.

Hoffman created the advisory council as a way to center students’ voices and improve K-12 education in the state, a news release said. Students go through an application process before being selected to represent their schools and students across the state.

Students

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Arizona ballot measure Proposition 208 leads in new poll

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The Invest in Education Act (Proposition 208), has support from nearly half of the voters surveyed, according to The Suffolk University/USA TODAY poll conducted Sept. 28-30. (Photo: Getty Images)

Proposition 208, which would raise taxes for education spending in Arizona, has a solid lead among likely voters, according to a new poll.

The Suffolk University/USA TODAY Network poll found that the Invest in Education Act, which would add a 3.5% tax surcharge on the wealthiest earners in the state, has support from nearly half of the voters surveyed.

Among the likely voters polled, 47% said they supported the measure, 37% opposed and 15% were undecided. The support largely falls along party lines, with more Democrats supporting the measure than Republicans. Independents were evenly split.

The live-interview poll of 500 likely voters in Arizona was conducted between Saturday and Wednesday and has a margin of error of 4.4 percentage points.

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Arizona parents struggle with decision between online and in-person learning | Coronavirus in Arizona

PHOENIX (3TV/CBS 5) – Today is the deadline for Washington Elementary School District parents to change their minds if they want their child in full-time in person learning, hybrid learning, or full-time online for the fall semester.

District spokesperson Pam Horton explained in an e-mail “we need to know parents’ selections for staffing and scheduling to start the second quarter.”

It’s a tough decision that thousands of parents across the state have had to do or may be asked to do this year. Some may be feeling frustrated after finding out they can’t change their decisions or there’s no flexibility as metrics fluctuate or trend up or down.

Mom Brittney Kuhn regrets choosing virtual learning in a survey sent to her back in August for her 8-year-old daughter Loveah.

“A little stressful. In August, they did a survey, they didn’t say anything about it being a permanent decision and it

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NAU program helping kids with special needs navigate online learning | State of Arizona Schools

FLAGSTAFF, AZ (3TV/CBS 5) — Sarah Dorman from Flagstaff has been on a mission to help her 11-year-old son with special needs and many other families facing online learning hurdles. The mother of two decided to reach out to Northern Arizona University with an idea to utilize college students who are hungry for experience.

“You can’t understate the value of our future educators; they have the heart for our kiddos,” said Dorman.

She helped kick-start a new program at the College of Education where seniors can get credit for going into families’ homes and helping students with disabilities with virtual learning.

“They are literally making a difference for some of our most deserving students in such a unique way. It has been wonderful,” said Michelle Novelli, an assistant clinical professor with the Department of Teaching and Learning at NAU.

Novelli said the students in the program trained for weeks before

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How Arizona School for the Arts adapted to virtual learning

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As schools debate about returning to online learning, the lack of internet access for many Americans is a big sticking point.

USA TODAY

PHOENIX — For Monica Sauer Anthony, adapting to the challenge of a virtual classroom started with a reenvisioning of what it even means to teach at a performing arts school.

A choir can’t really rehearse in a virtual classroom much less give a live performance.

Neither can an orchestra.

There’s too much digital delay involved in streaming to get everybody synced up.

When Gov. Doug Ducey ordered Arizona schools to close in March because of the pandemic, Sauer Anthony was teaching Music History and Culture, and Beginning Woodwinds, Flute and Oboe Studies at Arizona School for the Arts in downtown Phoenix.

As ASA began to make the switch to online learning, Sauer Anthony, who’s since become arts director and vice principal of student services, said the

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