5 things that show students aren’t the only ones learning during the pandemic

Sally Purchase describes teaching in 2020 as taking an “old bag of tricks,” and trying to adapt them to a completely new environment.



a young boy standing next to a building: Esperance, 6, and Christina Maneno, 8, pose for a portrait as they return to Jefferson Elementary School on Wednesday, Aug. 26, 2020.


© Cory Morse | MLive.com/Cory Morse | MLive.com/mlive.com/TNS
Esperance, 6, and Christina Maneno, 8, pose for a portrait as they return to Jefferson Elementary School on Wednesday, Aug. 26, 2020.

“Never in my 33 years of teaching did I ever think it would be like this,” the Muskegon High School teacher said of virtual learning, which the district is using this semester to mitigate the spread of the coronavirus.

“It’s a huge learning curve.”

With Michigan K-12 schools back in session for the fall – some virtually, some in-person, and some a mix of both – students aren’t the only ones doing the learning this year. Amid this unprecedented school year, teachers are learning some new things along the way, too.

The coronavirus pandemic has changed almost

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For Kansas schools, challenge will be ensuring special education students aren’t left behind – News – The Topeka Capital-Journal

It’s one challenge to close any learning gaps for special education students, but in a pandemic, just measuring those gaps will be another obstacle for Kansas schools, two special education leaders told The Topeka Capital-Journal.

Bert Moore, director of special education and title services for the Kansas Department of Education, and Heith Peine, executive director of student support services for Wichita Public Schools, joined The Capital-Journal’s Teaching Topeka podcast to discuss how special education teachers across Kansas have adapted to teaching in a pandemic.

State Commissioner of Education Randy Watson on Tuesday told the Kansas State Board of Education that, after a tour of just a few western Kansas school districts, he was becoming increasingly concerned that certain student groups, including special education students, are showing signs of academic regression as schools adjust their operations for the pandemic. More than 76,000 students, or 14.7% of all Kansas students, receive special

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