How These 6 Educators Are Integrating Antiracist Education Into Their Classrooms

Lorena German, Angela Censoplano, Oriana Miles, HelloGiglges

2020 has proven to be a pivotal year for education. The pandemic and the resurgence of the Black Lives Matter movement has altered our thinking about the role of schools in times of crisis. Widespread calls for education reform have prompted educators to examine their approach to addressing race, white privilege, and Black and Indigenous history in the classroom. This is because studies, like from Indiana University and Rutgers University, have proven that Black students are more likely to be suspended and expelled, are subject to lower expectations from teachers, and are less likely to be placed in gifted programs. 

But many teachers aren’t just waiting on state school boards to take action; they are rewriting their lesson plans to respond to our current political moment. HelloGiggles sat down with six educators from across the country to discuss how they plan to integrate

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AERA and NAEd statement in support of anti-racist education

The hallmark of a democratic society is support and encouragement of free speech. With that freedom as foundational–protecting generally welcome and unwelcome speech of the times–we can ever improve our imperfect, but laudable union. So important is this value that, in the United States, free speech is codified in the Constitution as the very First Amendment. A directly related hallmark of the academy is academic freedom, which has been recognized by courts as within the implied interests of the First Amendment.[1] Both notions, free speech and academic freedom, are deeply ingrained in free societies. Even when the ideas that emerge are unpopular, there is no more precious right than free speech. It is through respect for evidence-based discourse on difficult subjects that we advance as a society.

Our associations are proud of our enduring commitment to open, trustworthy inquiry and the hard work we have done in our scholarly field

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How These 6 Educators Are Integrating Anti-Racist Education Into Their Classroom

Lorena German, Angela Censoplano, Oriana Miles, HelloGiglges

2020 has proven to be a pivotal year for education. The pandemic and the resurgence of the Black Lives Matter movement has altered our thinking about the role of schools in times of crisis. Widespread calls for education reform have prompted educators to examine their approach to addressing race, white privilege, and Black and Indigenous history in the classroom. This is because studies, like from Indiana University and Rutgers University, have proven that Black students are more likely to be suspended and expelled, are subject to lower expectations from teachers, and are less likely to be placed in gifted programs. 

But many teachers aren’t just waiting on state school boards to take action, they are rewriting their lesson plans to respond to our current political moment. HelloGiggles sat down with six educators from across the country to discuss how they plan to integrate

Read More