4 big questions you may have about college admissions during the pandemic, answered by an Ivy League dean and a former NYT education writer



a group of people sitting on a bench: Graduating Masters students from the Columbia University Graduate School of Architecture, Planning and Preservation (GSAPP) gather the day before their online graduation ceremony, in Manhattan, New York City, May 15, 2020. Andrew Kelly/Reuters


© Andrew Kelly/Reuters
Graduating Masters students from the Columbia University Graduate School of Architecture, Planning and Preservation (GSAPP) gather the day before their online graduation ceremony, in Manhattan, New York City, May 15, 2020. Andrew Kelly/Reuters

For high school seniors and their parents, and for families of high school juniors as well, the ongoing pandemic has impacted every aspect of the college search and application process. 



a close up of a sign: "THE COLLEGE CONVERSATION: A Practical Companion for Parents to Guide Their Children Along the Path to Higher Education," by Eric Furda and Jacques Steinberg. Courtesy of Penguin Random House


© Courtesy of Penguin Random House
“THE COLLEGE CONVERSATION: A Practical Companion for Parents to Guide Their Children Along the Path to Higher Education,” by Eric Furda and Jacques Steinberg. Courtesy of Penguin Random House

Standardized tests like the SAT and ACT have become optional at most four-year colleges and universities, at least for this academic year and perhaps into the future. Many students who were scheduled to enroll on college campuses this fall have instead chosen to defer their arrival by taking a

Read More

4 questions about college admissions during a pandemic answered

For high school seniors and their parents, and for families of high school juniors as well, the ongoing pandemic has impacted every aspect of the college search and application process. 

THE COLLEGE CONVERSATION cover

“THE COLLEGE CONVERSATION: A Practical Companion for Parents to Guide Their Children Along the Path to Higher Education,” by Eric Furda and Jacques Steinberg.

Courtesy of Penguin Random House


Standardized tests like the SAT and ACT have become optional at most four-year colleges and universities, at least for this academic year and perhaps into the future. Many students who were scheduled to enroll on college campuses this fall have instead chosen to defer their arrival by taking a gap year, raising questions among applicants for next year’s class about whether the availability of precious seats will be tighter. 

Meanwhile, the ability to visit campuses in-person — normally a critical step as young people and their families assess potential fit —

Read More