America’s gifted education programs have a race problem. Can it be fixed?

This article about gifted education was produced in partnership with The Hechinger Report, a nonprofit, independent news organization focused on inequality and innovation in education. This is part 1 of the series “Gifted Education’s Race Problem.”

BUFFALO, N.Y. — On a crisp day in early March, two elementary school gifted and talented classes worked on activities in two schools, 3 miles and a world apart.

In airy PS 64 Frederick Law Olmsted, in affluent, white north Buffalo, 22 would-be Arctic explorers wrestled with how to build a shelter if their team leader had frostbite and snow blindness. Unusually for Buffalo’s public schools — where 20 percent of students are white and 46 percent are Black — about half of the fourth grade class was white.

In PS 61 Arthur O. Eve, on the city’s majority-Black East Side, 13 first graders, all of them Black, Latino or Asian American, folded paper

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New “Testing America’s Freedom” Podcast from NWEA Examines Equity in Education

NWEA, the not-for-profit educational assessment provider, announced today the launch of its new podcast, Testing America’s Freedom. Hosted by Dr. Aaliyah Samuel, Executive Vice President, Government Affairs & Partnerships at NWEA, the episodic series explores the role of race and assessment in American public education through thought-provoking interviews with current and future leaders in education.

Testing America’s Freedom delves deep into the lesser-known history of laws and policies that have perpetuated and exacerbated racial inequities within the education system. Samuel and her guests explore topics such as school funding, the importance of diversity in the education workforce, assessment purposes and design, and their link to modern-day systemic racism, discussing the challenges and opportunities presented by these urgent issues.

“The inequities within our public education system do not exist by accident, they are the result of carefully orchestrated policies that used tools like school funding, divestment and testing to perpetuate

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Integrity of ‘The 1619 Project,’ America’s education system at risk with election

OPINION: Trump’s latest campaign demonstrates the racial blindness of the administration and serves as a preview of what we can expect from four more years

Here is the truth, African Americans built this country for free. 

Yes, I said it. The horrors of the American slave trade contributed to America’s current economic success, military might, and role in shaping global culture. Sadly, these truths have not been part of the curriculum taught in America’s public schools. What students got instead was a whitewashed “history” that downplayed the enslavement and commoditization of Black bodies. 

Read More: Trump attacks ‘1619 Project,’ will sign executive order for ‘1776 Commission’

For the nation’s students, this culturally watered-down history of enslavement has actually done more harm than good. Instead of telling historical truth, our students were subjected to storylines about enslaved people being treated well, and the connection between America’s greatness and Western European enlightenment. 

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America’s missing kids: Amid COVID and online school, thousands of students haven’t shown up – News – Savannah Morning News

Before life went sideways in March, Jennifer Ludtke and her daughters were deeply rooted in the public schools in Las Vegas, Nevada.

Ludtke was a principal of a charter high school and had previously worked in the Clark County School District, and her daughters took advanced classes at a district middle school.

But this year, after a lot of research about COVID-19 and schooling options, and after the district announced it was starting virtually, Ludtke withdrew the girls and enrolled them in a state college that offers online classes. They’re earning both college and high school credit in English and math. (Because the girls are only 12 and 13, the college administrators asked to interview them first — then offered them a grant toward tuition.)

Ludtke herself resigned from her principal role and stepped back to teaching, which leaves her time to homeschool her daughters in their other necessary subjects,

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America’s Founders Knew Democracy Requires Public Education

Even before the United States had a Constitution, its founders were advocating for the creation of public education systems. The United States was an experiment in democracy unlike anything the world had ever seen, turning away from government dominated by elites and hoping that the common man could rule himself. If this experiment had any chance of standing the test of time, the nation needed far more schools to prepare everyday citizens for self-government. As James Madison, the father of our Constitution, remarked: “a popular Government, without popular information, or the means of acquiring it, is but a Prologue to a Farce or a Tragedy.” Thomas Jefferson similarly argued that governments “deriv[e] their just powers from the consent of the governed,” but that it is education that makes that consent possible. President Washington, in his last annual message to Congress, added that expanding education was essential to the perpetuation

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Paul Quinn College and Guild Education Partner to Expand Educational Options for America’s Workforce | News

DALLAS–(BUSINESS WIRE)–Sep 23, 2020–

Paul Quinn College (PQC), America’s first urban work college and one of the most celebrated colleges in the country, announced it is the first Historically Black College and University (HBCU) to join the Guild Education (Guild) network. This partnership opens the doors to some of America’s largest and most influential companies to PQC while providing more than three million workers an opportunity to earn a degree from one of the most unique colleges in the country.

This press release features multimedia. View the full release here: https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20200923005799/en/

“We are ecstatic to become a member of the Guild network,” said Dr. Michael J. Sorrell, president of Paul Quinn College. “Guild’s commitment to helping hardworking Americans achieve their educational and economic dreams is something that we strongly identify with. We are honored to have been selected by them for this important work.”

Guild partner employees will be able

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Paul Quinn College and Guild Education Partner to Expand Educational Options for America’s Workforce

DALLAS–(BUSINESS WIRE)–Sep 23, 2020–

Paul Quinn College (PQC), America’s first urban work college and one of the most celebrated colleges in the country, announced it is the first Historically Black College and University (HBCU) to join the Guild Education (Guild) network. This partnership opens the doors to some of America’s largest and most influential companies to PQC while providing more than three million workers an opportunity to earn a degree from one of the most unique colleges in the country.

This press release features multimedia. View the full release here: https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20200923005799/en/

“We are ecstatic to become a member of the Guild network,” said Dr. Michael J. Sorrell, president of Paul Quinn College. “Guild’s commitment to helping hardworking Americans achieve their educational and economic dreams is something that we strongly identify with. We are honored to have been selected by them for this important work.”

Guild partner employees will be able

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