Amendment G: Supporters say it would ‘protect’ education funding

SALT LAKE CITY — If you need proof of the Utah Legislature’s commitment to public education, Senate Majority Assistant Whip Ann Millner points to what lawmakers did when they were forced to slash the state budget this summer due to a steep decline in tax revenues resulting from the COVID-19 pandemic.

Income tax revenues, which are earmarked for education, dropped some $700 million. Meanwhile, other funding sources such as sales tax dropped too, but by a lower percentage. Because the Utah Legislature is constitutionally mandated to balance the state budget, lawmakers cut the state budget to align the reduced revenues, said Millner, R-Ogden.

Instead of imposing an across-the-board reduction, lawmakers followed the intent of HB357, which passed earlier in the year and would create a public education stabilization fund to hedge against future economic downturns, although the fund has not yet been funded.

“We funded an increase in funds for

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Some members raise concerns about proposed Amendment G, but State School Board takes no action

SALT LAKE CITY — Some members of the Utah State Board of Education raised concerns about proposed Constitutional Amendment G Thursday, but the board took no position on the proposal.



a building next to a fence: The Utah State Board of Education building in Salt Lake City is pictured on Tuesday, March 31, 2020.


© Kristin Murphy, Deseret News
The Utah State Board of Education building in Salt Lake City is pictured on Tuesday, March 31, 2020.

The proposed amendment, which is on the statewide ballot this election cycle, asks voters if they support expanding the use of state income tax to also support children and people with disabilities.

Income tax has been solely earmarked for public education since 1946, and in 1996, Utah voters passed a constitutional amendment that expanded the earmark to include higher education.

Board member Janet Cannon said the ballot language “is problematic because nowhere does it tell people that this will affect education in a big way.”

Amendment G asks: “Shall the Utah Constitution be amended to expand

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Utah State School Board takes no action on proposed Amendment G

SALT LAKE CITY — Some members of the Utah State Board of Education raised concerns about proposed Constitutional Amendment G Thursday, but the board took no position on the proposal.

The proposed amendment, which is on the statewide ballot this election cycle, asks voters if they support expanding the use of state income tax to also support children and people with disabilities.

Income tax has been solely earmarked for public education since 1946, and in 1996, Utah voters passed a constitutional amendment that expanded the earmark to include higher education.

Board member Janet Cannon said the ballot language “is problematic because nowhere does it tell people that this will affect education in a big way.”

Amendment G asks: “Shall the Utah Constitution be amended to expand the uses of money the state receives from income taxes and intangible property taxes to include supporting children and supporting people with a disability?”

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izzit.org Expands U.S. Constitution Education Library with First Amendment

Press release content from Globe Newswire. The AP news staff was not involved in its creation.

ERIE, Pa., Sept. 30, 2020 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — In response to today’s debates about individuals’ rights and an obvious need for more civics education, izzit.org, a highly popular online educator resource for more than 14 years, recently expanded its free U.S. Constitution Education Library to include a new interactive, online mini-course and a teaching unit on the First Amendment.

The First Amendment materials help students learn about the Bill of Rights, its history, what rights the First Amendment protects, and why it is important to know and understand them. Each educational component features video clips, discussion questions, and more.

The First Amendmentmini-course and teaching unit were developed from a three-part PBS series about the U.S. Constitution, A More or Less Perfect Union. izzit.org is the exclusive producer and

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Higher education minister’s clarification on universities Act amendment

BHUBANESWAR: Higher education minister Arun Kumar Sahoo on Sunday finally spoke on amendment of the Odisha Universities Act, 1989. He clarified that the amended Act will not curtail the autonomy of the universities. He also discussed on different points of amendment in a webinar.

The minister said upper age limit of the vice-chancellors has been increased from 65 years to 67 years. Tenure of the VCs has been hiked from three years to four years. “It will help VCs in bringing long term change in universities,” he added.

He said chancellor has the right to choose VC for a university. “The chancellor does not need recommendation of the state government. Out of three names, he/she will choose a name for VC post. That’s why we can say that the state government does not play any role in selecting VCs,” he added.

Sahoo said the government has brought amendment in the

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Opponents say proposed amendment could worsen public education’s unmet needs

SALT LAKE CITY — A current and former lawmaker, retired college professors and other education advocates urged a “no” vote Friday to a proposed state constitutional amendment that would expand the uses of income tax revenue to support programs for children and people with disabilities.

In a press conference conducted via Zoom, members of the Utah Citizens Counsel said Utah’s public education system is already underfunded and things could worsen if Utahns vote for Amendment G in the upcoming election.

Julie Miller, a former principal who worked at four Salt Lake City School District elementary schools, said the group agrees that health and social services programs for children and people with disabilities need more funding, but it should not come from tax revenue currently devoted to public education.

State income tax has been solely earmarked for public education for decades. A 1946 constitutional amendment required income tax to be allocated

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Amendment G vague, could worsen public education’s unmet needs, opponents say

SALT LAKE CITY — A current and former lawmaker, retired college professors and other education advocates urged a “no” vote Friday to a proposed state constitutional amendment that would expand the uses of income tax revenue to support programs for children and people with disabilities.

In a press conference conducted via Zoom, members of the Utah Citizens Counsel said Utah’s public education system is already underfunded and things could worsen if Utahns vote for Amendment G in the upcoming election.

Julie Miller, a former principal who worked at four Salt Lake City School District elementary schools, said the group agrees that health and social services programs for children and people with disabilities need more funding, but it should not come from tax revenue currently devoted to public education.

State income tax has been solely earmarked for public education for decades. A 1946 constitutional amendment required income tax to be allocated

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Amendment G vague, could worsen schools’ unmet needs, opponents say

SALT LAKE CITY — A current and former lawmaker, retired college professors and other education advocates urged a “no” vote Friday to a proposed state constitutional amendment that would expand the uses of income tax revenue to support programs for children and people with disabilities.

In a press conference conducted via Zoom, members of the Utah Citizens Counsel said Utah’s public education system is already underfunded and things could worsen if Utahns vote for Amendment G in the upcoming election.

Julie Miller, a former principal who worked at four Salt Lake City School District elementary schools, said the group agrees that health and social services programs for children and people with disabilities need more funding, but it should not come from tax revenue currently devoted to public education.

State income tax has been solely earmarked for public education for decades. A 1946 constitutional amendment required income tax to be allocated

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Guest opinion: Amendment G is much more than it appears on paper

Tucked way down at the bottom of this year’s ballot are seven constitutional amendments for which the Legislature wants us all to vote “yes.” They are strategically placed, to get us in the mood for voting “yes” on the very last one — Amendment G. It is deceptively titled “Use Income and Property Tax Revenues to Support Children and Individuals with Disabilities Amendment.” It is a bait-and-switch trick to remove the only constitutional protection for all education funding against legislative raids on school money.

If you, like most Utahns, want more funding for schools, vote “no.” The legislature does not need a constitutional amendment to spend more money on disabled children or adults.

This is legislative revenge for voters daring to defy the December 2019 Tax Reform scheme. Our schools still struggle to recover from the impacts of the Great Recession coupled with income tax cuts enacted right at the

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