Miami faculty adapt to online and hybrid teaching; developing tools and techniques that will serve students far beyond COVID-19 pandemic


By Cliff Peale,  director of executive communications

norm-krumpe-in-studio

Norm Krumpe in the home studio he shares with Jane Keiser (image courtesy Krumpe).

Across all of Miami University’s campuses, faculty are changing the way they teach.

  • In the nursing labs at Miami Regionals, Tina Andrews-Parks used help from the E-campus unit on the Hamilton and Middletown campuses to familiarize herself with SpeedGrader, where she can tabulate and analyze the responses to each question in seconds for her online class. “I won’t go backwards to paper testing,” she said.
  • In information systems and analytics, Bob Leonard uses software that enables students to analyze larger data sets in his online courses. “It’s going to be great bringing newly developed tools back to the classroom, because students will have that (online) scaffolding in addition to their professor as a resource,” he said.
  • In political science, Monica Schneider has recruited speakers to address her Campaigns and
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Special education teachers adapt to virtual learning

Posted on 6 October 2020 at 4:38pm

COLUMBIA – Some special education students have a hard time with online learning, but they’re not alone.

Their special education teachers are right there alongside them.

“It’s difficult. Because we really rely heavily on relationships,” Derby Ridge Elementary special education teacher Patrika Brown said.

Brown said students with special needs require more attention to make sure they’re learning, but more attention means more complicated scheduling.

“The hardest part about like, figuring out what time you have in your schedule, where’s the gap, how many you can get in one group, so you won’t have to, you know, keep repeating information all day,” Battle High School special education teacher Donndre Smith said.

Every student is unique and has different needs and learning speeds. One of Smith’s students rarely spoke.

“Like it really, really made it hard for me to help him because I couldn’t

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Special needs students struggle to adapt to on-screen, hands-off learning amid pandemic

For sixth-grader Santiago Casas, who has autism and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, going to school means staying home and staring at a computer for six hours.

The screen, like a drawbridge stuck in the up position, has left him stranded, cut off from the cognitive and social nurturing he received in the classroom.

He has trouble with organization, so clicking between online calendars, messages, documents and assignments for six advanced classes is “like negotiating a maze,” said his mother. He has trouble concentrating, so sitting still through the 115-minute periods of his new online block schedule at Glades Middle School on two-dimensional Zoom and Teams meeting platforms is “like torture,” she said.

Santiago used to love school. Now he hates it. So do his parents and teachers. Remote learning, a disruption to everyone’s education during the coronavirus pandemic, creates an even higher barrier for students with special physical, emotional

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Education nonprofits pivot, adapt offerings to school schedules | News

While child care organizations have worked to rapidly expand services, organizations focused on after-school and supplemental education have adapted their programs to the Bozeman School District’s schedule.

Many parents have been faced with the struggle of finding child care for the three days a week students are not in class. Education nonprofits, like those focused on outdoor science and second languages, have broadened their offerings to align with the blended model of learning in the school district.

“Our worlds are kind of shrunk down more than usual,” said Hannah Jacobsma, program coordinator with the World Language Initiative – Montana. “To have this opportunity to connect with a different group of kids or an adult that has experience in a different culture, it’s exciting and they might not have it otherwise right now.”

World Languages Initiative typically has 450 kids per year in its after-school program with 25 coaches teaching in

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Special-needs students struggle to adapt to online learning

For sixth-grader Santiago Casas, who has autism and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, going to school means staying home and staring at a computer for six hours.

The screen, like a drawbridge stuck in the up position, has left him stranded, cut off from the cognitive and social nurturing he received in the classroom.

He has trouble with organization, so clicking between online calendars, messages, documents and assignments for six advanced classes is “like negotiating a maze,” said his mother. He has trouble concentrating, so sitting still through the 115-minute periods of his new online block schedule at Glades Middle School on two-dimensional Zoom and Teams meeting platforms is “like torture,” she said.

Santiago used to love school. Now he hates it. So do his parents and teachers. Remote learning, a disruption to everyone’s education during the coronavirus pandemic, creates an even higher barrier for students with special physical, emotional and

Read More