An increase in racial incidents spurs new generation of social justice leaders to action | News

ANDERSON — At the successful conclusion of the 1984 trial in which an Elwood woman had been acquitted of the murder of her abusive husband, she gave her Superior Court 3 public defender, Patrick Murphy, a token of her gratitude, a figurine of a Ku Klux Klansman.

“I didn’t know this kind of stuff still existed. I didn’t know this stuff went on still, that it really kept going,” said Murphy, now a magistrate in Marion County.

After keeping it tucked away in a box for many years, Murphy eventually disposed of the curiosity.

“I did not display it. It obviously was not my viewpoint,” he said. “It was too disconcerting.”

What’s noteworthy is the woman’s comfort with the Klan’s philosophy, her apparent assumption that others shared her sentiments and her belief the figurine was an appropriate way to demonstrate her appreciation.

This is an example of the white supremacy

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Love Island Dr Alex wants ‘action’ from MPs on mental health education

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Love Island star Dr Alex George has called on government to take ‘action’ on mental health education in schools.

Dr Alex tragically lost his brother Llŷr to mental health in July and now wants to see the issue taught in schools.

He told Lorraine on Tuesday: ‘There’s some fantastic work being done… people who are really passionate about this and there are incredible resources out there with Time to Change, Heads Together, but we need to integrate that in all schools around the country, so you haven’t just got pockets of good mental health teaching and support, it should be in every school.

‘In my opinion, every child has a right to good mental health education and good mental health support, which means counsellors in every school.’

He went on: ‘Talking is

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Some members raise concerns about proposed Amendment G, but State School Board takes no action

SALT LAKE CITY — Some members of the Utah State Board of Education raised concerns about proposed Constitutional Amendment G Thursday, but the board took no position on the proposal.



a building next to a fence: The Utah State Board of Education building in Salt Lake City is pictured on Tuesday, March 31, 2020.


© Kristin Murphy, Deseret News
The Utah State Board of Education building in Salt Lake City is pictured on Tuesday, March 31, 2020.

The proposed amendment, which is on the statewide ballot this election cycle, asks voters if they support expanding the use of state income tax to also support children and people with disabilities.

Income tax has been solely earmarked for public education since 1946, and in 1996, Utah voters passed a constitutional amendment that expanded the earmark to include higher education.

Board member Janet Cannon said the ballot language “is problematic because nowhere does it tell people that this will affect education in a big way.”

Amendment G asks: “Shall the Utah Constitution be amended to expand

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Utah State School Board takes no action on proposed Amendment G

SALT LAKE CITY — Some members of the Utah State Board of Education raised concerns about proposed Constitutional Amendment G Thursday, but the board took no position on the proposal.

The proposed amendment, which is on the statewide ballot this election cycle, asks voters if they support expanding the use of state income tax to also support children and people with disabilities.

Income tax has been solely earmarked for public education since 1946, and in 1996, Utah voters passed a constitutional amendment that expanded the earmark to include higher education.

Board member Janet Cannon said the ballot language “is problematic because nowhere does it tell people that this will affect education in a big way.”

Amendment G asks: “Shall the Utah Constitution be amended to expand the uses of money the state receives from income taxes and intangible property taxes to include supporting children and supporting people with a disability?”

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Sparking national action on equity and inclusion in higher education – Dal News

What’s dialogue without action? What’s action without dialogue?

Coordinated by the University of Toronto, the National Dialogues and Action for Inclusive Higher Education and Communities launches this week with a two-day forum (Oct. 1-2) on anti-Black racism and Black inclusion.

It’s the first in a series of forums that will bring Dalhousie and dozens of other universities and colleges across Canada together in a structured national conversation to share experiences and explore and learn best practices.

But organizers say what makes this initiative different is its emphasis on creating “concrete actions.” The forums will be split into two key components: a first day of discussions that address specific challenges, opportunities and barriers around particular issues, followed by a second day of extensive deliberations that will generate action items and establish accountability mechanisms to ensure lasting change.

Outcomes of the forums will be used in the development of a charter of

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Pearson: Vital Signs report points to need for immediate action from all of us

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Titled Be the Change, it not only serves as a roadmap for change in the midst of COVID-19 but a call to action for each of us, not just our leaders. Far more Londoners are vulnerable than at this point two years ago. Our failure to sufficiently act in the past has resulted in a more protracted challenge, one requiring every Londoner and organization to alter permanently things we were too willing to accept previously.

It is one thing to flatten the curve, but another entirely to transform our community. Just how can we come together to create greater equity, equality, opportunity, stability and safety for all our citizens, especially those in the most vulnerable conditions? That is the task before us. This pandemic did not cause such problems, merely magnified them, but it has highlighted not only our need to act, but revealed the inner strength

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