CAE Partners with Education Research and Development Institute

Council for Aid to Education, Inc. (CAE), a leading provider of performance-based, authentic assessments measuring essential college and career readiness skills, announced it joined the Education Research and Development Institute (ERDI). Partnering with the well-respected 35-year-old organization, CAE will contribute as a thought leader and work collaboratively to develop insights that will inform the evolution of its student-centric educational solutions and services.

“We are honored to partner with ERDI whose members comprise our country’s top education practice leaders committed to ensuring all students have access to the highest quality learning experiences,” said Bob Yayac, president and CEO of CAE. “Joining ERDI’s community allows CAE to leverage the latest in PK-12 research and on-the-ground experience to best meet the needs of students today and into the future.”

ERDI gathers top PK-12 education leaders and solutions providers from more than 250 school districts across the U.S. who are focused on the continuous

Read More

UC Nobel winners underscore value of investments in higher education

The awarding of the Nobel Prizes to three University of California faculty members this month underscores the importance of the state’s world-class public higher education system to advancing the pace of discovery and innovation that fuels economic growth and improves lives.

UC Berkeley biochemist Jennifer Doudna shared the 2020 Nobel Prize in chemistry with colleague Emmanuelle Charpentier for the co-development of CRISPR-Cas9, a genome editing breakthrough that has revolutionized biomedicine.

This technology allows scientists to rewrite DNA — the code of life — in any organism, including human cells. It has opened the door to treatments for thousands of diseases as well as new possibilities across biology and agriculture.

UC Berkeley Professor emeritus Reinhard Genzel and UCLA Professor Andrea Ghez shared half of the 2020 Nobel Prize in physics for “the discovery of a supermassive compact object at the centre of our galaxy.”

They join a proud legacy of the

Read More

Coursera Couple Returns to Higher Ed With $14.5M to Recreate In-Person Learning, Online

Pandemic closes school. Students go home. Remote classes falter. Child is disengaged. Parent builds edtech.

So goes the origin story of many education startups born this year, like ClassEDU, which raised $16 million to put some oomph in Zoom classrooms. It was started by one of the co-founders of Blackboard, now a household name in education technology.

Now, a couple with similar industry cred has a similar vision—along with plenty of funding.

“We want to build from the ground up an inclusive learning system for students and faculty, one that can recreate engaging, live learning experiences online,” says Dan Avida.

Avida is the husband of Coursera co-founder Daphne Koller, and one of the first board members of the company that helped put the spotlight on massive online open courses, or MOOCs. The couple is no longer with Coursera, which is now valued at $2.5 billion. But they are not done

Read More

‘Opportunity has been missed’ in higher education

The first Budget from the country’s first dedicated Department of Further and Higher Education evoked a mixed reaction, with student leaders claiming it ignored barriers preventing access to college in favour of piecemeal one-off funding.

There was a general welcome for the focus it put on higher education, and some praise for the commitment minister Simon Harris is bringing to the role, but there was also criticism of “missed opportunities”.

The €3.3bn 2021 spend includes €50m to be paid directly to about 200,000 full-time students this year – €250 each – to help soften the Covid-19 financial blow.

Union of Students in Ireland (USI) president Lorna Fitzpatrick welcomed it, but said the Government failed to address the “underlying problem – that students face the highest fees in the EU”.

Other commitments include:

:: Retaining almost 2,300 college places created this year – and adding a further 2,700;

:: Review of

Read More

Private higher education institutions exempted from running exams in states under conditional MCO, says ministry

PETALING JAYA: Private higher education institutions have been exempted by the Higher Education Ministry to run exams during the conditional movement control order (MCO).

The exemptions are for exams conducted by external examination providers or international exams during the conditional MCO period, according to the schedule that has been set, the ministry said.

“This decision involves a total of 3,031 local students and 195 international students in four states that’s under the conditional MCO.

“Students must get a letter of confirmation from their respective institutions,” the ministry said in a statement on Wednesday (Oct 14).

Exams under three categories are involved in the exemption.

The first group are students undertaking the A-Levels, Australian Matriculation, Canadian pre-university and the like.

The second are students who have registered to sit for the exam with external exam providers or for international exams, and lastly, students who have registered to sit for the Association

Read More

Higher Ed’s Shameful Silence on Diversity

This past summer, far-right media outlets from Fox News to Breitbart flooded the airwaves and the internet with stories about diversity training within the federal government. These features castigated the programs, accusing them of encouraging discrimination against white people, especially white men, by promoting ideas of white racial inferiority.

This, of course, was nonsense. Diversity training does no such thing.

Mary Morten, the president and founder of a company that conducts racial-equity trainings for government agencies and nonprofits, explained recently that the interactive trainings they lead simply “do a variety of things to make sure that people understand some of the history of what bias has looked like in this country, [and] what power and privilege have looked like.” She added that at the end of their sessions, there is always “some action planning” designed to help participants figure out how they can take what they learned and “embed

Read More

Higher Education Market| Emergence of Transitional Education (TNE) to Boost the Market Growth

The higher education market size is poised to grow by USD 37.82 billion during 2020-2024, according to the latest report by Technavio. The report offers an up-to-date analysis regarding the current market scenario, latest trends and drivers, and the overall market environment. The report also provides the market impact and new opportunities created due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Download a Free Sample of REPORT with COVID-19 Crisis and Recovery Analysis.

This press release features multimedia. View the full release here: https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20201013005774/en/

Technavio has announced its latest market research report titled Global Higher Education Market 2020-2024 (Graphic: Business Wire)

The growth of internationalization in the education sector is one of the key factors driving the higher education market growth. The rising need to attract the best students and staff, improve the quality of education, and generate revenue is leading several higher education institutions to internationalize education. This emerging concept has

Read More

How the US Department of Education can protect students and promote equity in higher education

Higher education was at a crossroads even before the COVID-19 crisis. In recent years, the cost of college attendance has risen and student debt levels have exploded. Discussions about debt forgiveness and reconfiguring higher education finance have moved out of wonky policy circles and into public discourse. Meanwhile, the costs of college have risen dramatically in recent years, perhaps exacerbated by decreases in state funding, and leading many institutions of higher education (“IHEs”) to provide online and lower-cost solutions to supplement or replace the “traditional” four-year, residential college—a trend that will be accelerated by the COVID-19 crisis. Simultaneously, college demographics have shifted, with an increasing population of “nontraditional” students, including those who are older, lack financial support from parents or other family members, and are more likely to have dependents. Disparities in higher education have had disproportionate, negative, and long-lasting effects on Black and Latino communities. And COVID-19 continues has

Read More

Donald Trump vs. Joe Biden: Where they stand on COVID, education and more

Amid the tumult of the 2020 presidential campaign, one dynamic has remained constant: The Nov. 3 election offers voters a choice between substantially different policy paths.

President Donald Trump, like many fellow Republicans, holds out tax reductions and regulatory cuts as economic imperatives and frames himself as a conservative champion in the culture wars. The president has offered few details about how he would pull the levers of government in a second term. His most consistent argument focuses on stopping Democratic opponent Joe Biden and his party from pushing U.S. policy leftward.

Biden, for his part, is not the socialist caricature depicted by Trump. But he is every bit a center-left Democrat who frames the federal government as the force to combat the coronavirus, rebuild the economy and address centuries of institutional racism and systemic inequalities. The former vice president and U.S. senator also offers his deal-making past as evidence

Read More

As Election Looms, Experts Say Stakes Are High for Harvard and Higher Ed | News

With just three weeks before Election Day, experts say much is at stake for Harvard in the outcome of the contest between President Donald J. Trump and former Vice President Joseph R. Biden Jr.

University President Lawrence S. Bacow said in a Sept. 25 interview with The Crimson that he would not speculate on the outcome of the election and that the University will always try to “work cooperatively with the government, regardless of who is in power.”

But in recent months, the relationship between Harvard and Trump has been more contentious than cooperative.

In April, Trump said that Harvard would have to “pay back” the nearly $9 million it was allocated in the CARES Act, the largest economic stimulus package in American history. Soon after his criticism, Harvard announced that it would not “seek or accept” the funds to which it was entitled.

In July, shortly after Harvard announced

Read More