Report argues for student focused approach to improving higher education outcomes

Further Education News

The FE News Channel gives you the latest education news and updates on emerging education strategies and the #FutureofEducation and the #FutureofWork.

Providing trustworthy and positive Further Education news and views since 2003, we are a digital news channel with a mixture of written word articles, podcasts and videos. Our specialisation is providing you with a mixture of the latest education news, our stance is always positive, sector building and sharing different perspectives and views from thought leaders, to provide you with a think tank of new ideas and solutions to bring the education sector together and come up with new innovative solutions and ideas.

FE News publish exclusive peer to peer thought leadership articles from our feature writers, as well as user generated content across our network of over 3000 Newsrooms, offering multiple sources of the latest education news across the Education and Employability sectors.

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‘Everyone is tired’ | Teacher shares thoughts as more schools reopen

Lauren Jewett said she is happy to be back with students, her concern is how these added expectations may impact teachers.

NEW ORLEANS — Schools reopening can mean more responsibility for teachers as many are now not only teaching in person, but virtually as well.

Monday, many teachers and students in New Orleans returned to their classrooms for the first time since March, including grades 5-12.

Lauren Jewett is an elementary special education teacher at a school in New Orleans. She’s been back in the classroom since Sept. 21 when younger grades began going back in NOLA Public Schools.

“I’m mostly serving students in person, but I have some virtual so I’m doing both at the same time,” Jewett said. “Everyone has to have patience and know everything will take longer.”

Because it takes longer to get kids in and out of school everyday, Jewett feels teachers have less time

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Del. will double funding to settle education equity lawsuit

The state of Delaware has settled a 2018 lawsuit that accused the state of being complicit in the disparities experienced by students who are low income, have disabilities or are English language learners.

As part of the settlement between Gov. John Carney, the NAACP of Delaware and Delawareans for Educational Opportunity, the state will allocate millions of dollars in funding to support students who are most in need.

“Delaware’s current educational resource allocation system does not recognize the additional needs of children living in poverty and English learners. That system is outdated and inequitable,” said Karen Lantz, legal and policy director at the ACLU of Delaware, which represented the plaintiffs along with the national law firm Arnold & Porter and the Community Legal Aid Society.

“Our expectation is that this settlement will begin systemic changes that result in a fundamental shift in how resources are allocated, so every student in

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Pompeo and DeVos warn about Confucius Institute influence in US classrooms and campuses

The leaders of the State Department and the Education Department joined forces to warn that K-12 classrooms and universities nationwide are being targeted by the Chinese Communist Party’s influence operations, including the presence of Confucius Institutes on campus.

Secretary of State Mike Pompeo and Education Secretary Betsy DeVos sent letters on Friday to the chief state school officers for all 50 states related to grade school and high school education, as well as to the presidents of U.S. colleges and other institutions of higher learning, warning about China’s influence on learning in the United States and specifically calling out Confucius Classrooms and Confucius Institutes.

This comes as the State Department ramps up its critiques of China’s actions (including its coronavirus cover-up, the oppression of the Uyghurs, its power grab in Hong Kong, the military build-up in the South China Sea, China’s potential use of Huawei and apps such as

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First day of Senate confirmation hearings for Supreme Court nominee Amy Coney Barrett concludes

WASHINGTON (NewsNation Now) — President Donald Trump’s Supreme Court nominee Judge Amy Coney Barrett appeared before the Senate for the first day of confirmation hearings Monday.

The Senate Judiciary Committee hearings will span four days, beginning with members and Barrett herself making opening statements.

Stream the hearings live right here; check back for live updates.

Opening statements

Senator Lindsey Graham, R-S.C., made the first opening statement before the Senate Judiciary Committee hearing Monday for Supreme Court nominee Judge Amy Coney Barrett. Graham, the chairman of the Senate Judiciary Committee, discussed the legacy of late Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg.

“This is a vacancy that has occurred to a tragic loss of a great woman. And we’re going to fill that vacancy with another great woman. The bottom line here is that the senate is doing its duty. Constitutionally,” said Graham.

Graham went on to reiterate Barrett’s written statement sent to the

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5 ways to help students with disabilities who struggle with online learning

Interventions may include meeting with the student and parent, letting the student fidget, asking the student for help, offering incentives, and helping find an outside therapist if needed.

Getty Images: Peter Dazeley

The change from learning in person to learning remotely has had an impact on all students, but that impact may be greater for students with disabilities.

Educators to consider taking the following steps if they notice a student struggling with remote instruction.

1. Meet with the student and parent. Ask the student what his biggest challenge is and where he’s getting stuck, says Christina Reese, a licensed clinical professional counselor who trains school therapists who work with students with mental health disorders in Maryland and Pennsylvania. Then together with the parents, try to problem-solve it.

2. Let the student fidget. Once you have identified the challenge, determine what supports the student might need to have around his device

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Six candidates vying for three seats on the Muskegon Board of Education in the Nov. 3 election

MUSKEGON, MI – Six candidates are vying for three open seats on the Muskegon Board of Education in the Nov. 3 general election.

Muskegon Public Schools is one of the largest districts in the county with 3,514 registered students this fall.

School board trustees serve six-year terms and are tasked with a variety of jobs including, approving an annual budget, hire and evaluate the superintendent, and adopting policies that give the district administration direction to set priorities and achieve its goals.

Three of the candidates – Zachary Anderson, Billie Bruce and Louis Churchwell – are incumbents seeking reelection.

The other three candidate are new challengers – Kwame Kamau James, Nicholas Sima and Jonathan Witmer.

Here is some background information provided by each of the candidates:

  • Anderson, 27, attended Grand Valley State University (GVSU) and now works as a consultant. He has served on the Muskegon school board for the past
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David Ramadan column: Stop spending on bricks-and-mortar and start investing in online education | Columnists

It also is evident that those who might prefer a blackboard have a long way to go. The days of a camera aimed at an overhead projector slide are more than just old school, and the idea that we’ll be able to capture and hold the attention of the TikTok generation with a barebones Zoom call isn’t going to get it.

At Harvard University, David Malan teaches CS50, an introductory computer science class, and one of the school’s most popular courses. The professor has said it might be “a better educational experience to watch CS50’s lectures online than attend them in person.”

Writing about Malan and his work for The New Yorker, Eren Orbey characterized this year’s transition to online learning as a struggle for many professors.

In March, he wrote, “no more than five hundred Harvard instructors had virtual teaching experience.” But in a matter of days, the number

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Lakewood elementary school teachers deliver books to kids during remote learning

First grade teachers Nicole Andregg and Patricia Birch found a way to stay connected to their students.

LAKEWOOD, Ohio — This year, the school year is unprecedented, and different on so many levels for everyone, including teachers.

Two first-grade teachers, from Hayes Elementary School in Lakewood, found a way to bridge the gap and connect with kids, through reading.

When their students started the school year off remotely, Nicole Andregg and Patricia Birch knew many of their students didn’t have what they needed.

“We also knew that a lot of kids don’t have books in their hands all the time. So we thought, ‘why don’t we just start a bookmobile?’ We can deliver books to children and say hi to them. And they’ll get to see our faces and have a little special treat from us,” Patricia said.

“They’re just smiling and beaming and we are, too,” Nicole echoed.

Teaming

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Genesee County ISD special education funding formula violates state law, judge says

FLINT, MI — The formula used to funnel some special education dollars through the Genesee Intermediate School Distrct to local districts violates state law, an administrative law judge has said.

For Flint schools, this could mean the district will get more special education funding because it has a higher than average percentage of special education students. It also could mean less money for school districts with a high total student count but lower percentage of special education students, like Grand Blanc Community Schools.

As it currently stands, the GISD Mandatory Plan appropriates $3.8 million of Act 18 special education funds back to local districts based on a three-part formula: 1. Total special education headcount 2. Full-time-equivalent (FTE) special education student head count 3. Total FTE headcount. FTE head count is adjusted for part-time student numbers. These three factors are currently equally weighted.

However, Administrative Law Judge Michael St. John in

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