Why It’s Worth Learning Outdoor Skills Like Rock Climbing Online

Summers ago, back in ‘the normal times,’ I attended the Arc’teryx Climbing Academy in Squamish, BC. It was a special few days, not only because of the nightly film screenings and live music, but for the excellent clinics with world-class guides at a fraction of the cost—not to mention the access to the professional athletes, who don’t typically teach climbing, and also instruct during the academy. Ahh, normal times.

Anchor building at last year’s climbing academy
Showcasing crack climbing techniques courtesy Arc’teryx

This year’s academy couldn’t happen in person, but Arc’teryx adapted to the now-COVID times, doing a remarkable job bringing the academy online. First were marquee film screenings—like the premiere of Free As Can Be, a film about Yosemite climbing legend Mark Hudon and rising pro Jordan Cannon’s friendship and ascents of Freerider on El Cap—as well as the annual photo competition. Although this year’s contest was a “compilation contest,” not produced by photographers during

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Self-described ‘shy Korean boy’ grows up to become Utah’s 2021 Teacher of the Year

SALT LAKE CITY — A self-described “shy Korean boy,” John Arthur credits his junior high and high school teachers for helping him find his voice.



John Arthur, Utah’s Teacher of the Year, wears a special punk tuxedo jacket and gym shorts as he poses for a photo in his sixth grade classroom at Meadowlark Elementary School in Salt Lake City after learning of the award on Thursday, Oct. 1, 2020.


© Steve Griffin, Deseret News
John Arthur, Utah’s Teacher of the Year, wears a special punk tuxedo jacket and gym shorts as he poses for a photo in his sixth grade classroom at Meadowlark Elementary School in Salt Lake City after learning of the award on Thursday, Oct. 1, 2020.

“If it wasn’t for them, one, I might not have made it through high school, but two, I certainly wouldn’t be a teacher and I wouldn’t have the guts to say anything that’s on my mind or my heart,” said Arthur, addressing the Utah State Board of Education Thursday, moments after being name Utah’s 2021 Teacher of the Year.

Now in his eighth year of teaching, Arthur teaches sixth grade at Meadowlark Elementary School, a

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Liberals to announce community safety plan as NDP focuses on education Thursday

BC Liberal Leader Andrew Wilkinson will be in Vancouver on Thursday to discuss his plans for community safety.



a man wearing a suit and tie: Liberal Leader Andrew Wilkinson removes his face mask before speaking during a campaign stop in Vancouver, on Saturday, September 26, 2020. A provincial election will be held in British Columbia on October 24. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck


Liberal Leader Andrew Wilkinson removes his face mask before speaking during a campaign stop in Vancouver, on Saturday, September 26, 2020. A provincial election will be held in British Columbia on October 24. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck

Wilkinson is expected to roll out solutions to address community concerns over tent cities emerging in parks across the province. The Liberal leader has focused the early part of the campaign on community concerns connected to homelessness issues in Maple Ridge, Vancouver and Victoria.

The BC Liberals have spent the last three days talking about cutting the PST for the next year if elected. On Thursday, Wilkinson will be alongside Liberal candidates George Affleck, Jas Johal and Cheryl Ashlie.

Wilkinson is attempting to address both the issues connected with addictions and homelessness while addressing the

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UB Graduate School of Education waives GRE requirement for non-licensure programs

BUFFALO, N.Y. – The University at Buffalo Graduate School of Education will not require applicants to submit Graduate Record Examinations (GRE) scores for admission to academic programs that do not require professional licensure for the next two years.

By waiving the requirement, the school will remove a barrier to admission that disproportionately affects talented students facing financial hardships and applicants from disadvantaged socioeconomic backgrounds. GRE tests are expensive – costing students hundreds of dollars. Time-consuming and costly test preparation services and materials add to the financial burden.

“There is plenty of research that suggests the GRE is not necessarily a good predictor of academic success. At a time where access to the test is even more challenging, due to COVID-19, and at a time when GSE has gone on the record as trying to actively challenge systems of oppressions, removing this barrier just makes good sense,” says Suzanne Rosenblith, PhD,

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COVID-19 showed the need for workers to update skills

The launch of Saskatchewan Polytechnic’s new School of Continuing Education comes at an important time in our province’s history.



logo, company name: Saskatchewan Polytechnic wants workers to better their skills during COVID-19.


© Provided by Leader Post
Saskatchewan Polytechnic wants workers to better their skills during COVID-19.

Nearly every person and/or business in Saskatchewan has been affected by the disruption stemming from the COVID-19 pandemic. Whether this has meant a job loss or a scramble to find qualified employees, the pandemic accelerated a trend we have been witnessing for several years.

As my colleagues at Polytechnics Canada — a national association of Canada’s leading colleges, polytechnics and institutes of technology, which I chair — recently noted in a paper to the federal government on 2021 spending priorities: “Even before the pandemic, there was a need to retrain and upskill our mid-career workforce to keep up with changing skills requirements. In the post-pandemic recovery, rapid reskilling will become critical to ensuring we have the

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What 2020 taught us about the importance of the humanities

“The archive is a response that attempts to make sense of (the pandemic), to organize it, to collect it, to share it with future historians,” Tebeau said. “To have our students and others describe it is a pretty powerful way to make sense of this moment. Many in our community have found solace and fellowship in the spaces of the archive.”

In a time where it seems the nation is plagued with constant division and individuals are facing new experiences with isolation and loss of normalcy, the journal is a prime example of what the humanities can do: connect and bridge understanding.

“We’re basically mysteries to each other, right? Everybody is. Then the past is a mystery to the present; the present is a mystery to the future … the humanities are just trying to bridge that divide,” O’Donnell said. “We tend to talk more about bridging between cultures, but

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Health Beat: Ways to prevent stroke you might not know | Health Beat

SAN DIEGO – Every 40 seconds, someone in the United States has a stroke. Every four minutes, someone dies. How can you lower your chances of being one of them? First, find out if you’re at risk.

“The risk factors are usually the same — smoking, aging, diabetes, high blood pressure, and high cholesterol,” said Dr. Mahmoud Malas, chief of vascular and endovascular surgery at the University of California San Diego.

Maintaining a healthy diet, quitting smoking, and exercising regularly can improve your odds, but there are other, little-known ways to defend yourself. One is flossing. Some studies have shown improved gum health may slow the progression of atherosclerosis, or narrowing of the arteries.

“The problem with this blockage is that little pieces of plaque break off and goes to the brain and cause an embolic stroke,” Malas explained.

Also, a recent analysis found consuming one to three cups of

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Gov. Lamont discusses the recent COVID-19 outbreaks in Connecticut

Governor Ned Lamont provided an update into the state’s COVID-19 response efforts Thursday evening.  

FOX61’s Brent Hardin asks Governor Lamont about COVID-19 in CT

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The Governor’s office released Wednesday’s COVID-19 numbers showing an even higher positivity rate for the virus. There were 10,372 tests administered and 192 came back positive, yielding a 1.9 percent positivity rate. 

Hospitalizations increased again by three people bringing the current total to 107 patients. There were also three new COVID-19 related deaths, Connecticut’s COVID-19 death toll has reached 4,511 people.  

Lamont spoke about nursing homes and the third-party independent review from Mathematic. The state is already

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Houghton Mifflin Harcourt cuts 525 jobs as COVID-19 accelerates online learning

Boston-based textbook publisher Houghton Mifflin Harcourt said Thursday it is laying off 525 employees as the coronavirus pandemic accelerates the shift to digital learning tools.

The company disclosed in a public filing that the reduction comes as part of Houghton Mifflin’s “ongoing assessment of its cost structure amid the COVID-19 pandemic,” and it is in line with the digital strategy the company first proposed to investors last October. The company’s stock closed up over 16 percent on the news.

A company spokesperson declined to break down how many Boston employees have been affected.

The layoff — along with a recently introduced early retirement program, which 166 employees opted into means the company has trimmed its workforce by 22 percent. That figure accounts for an undisclosed number of newly added digital-first jobs.

“As districts embrace new remote learning formats and rely more heavily on digital solutions than ever before, HMH

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